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Aug
8
comment Tips for adding more personality to characters?
If your characters never surprise you, they will never surprise anyone else. Give them the freedom to be human, to act and speak of their own accord rather than rigidly adhere to the skeleton of a plot outline.
Aug
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
22
comment Best e-book formatting process?
Absolutely. Word and word processors are a thing of the past for me. Check the link and look at the features.
Jul
22
answered Best e-book formatting process?
Jun
30
revised Style of writing as told from the point of view of the main character
added 1 characters in body
Jun
28
answered Style of writing as told from the point of view of the main character
Jun
23
comment I'm getting tired of “he said” “she said” in dialogue; how do I get around it?
This is my feeling as well. "Said" is an invisible word that doesn't get in the way of good dialogue, whereas screeched, shrilled, and so on simply call attention to the writer's inability to elicit emotion inside the quotes.
Jun
18
comment Please advise on this comma among semi-colons and provide a more concise sentence
I agree and +1. But please don't listen to Joe Blow. The last thing the world needs is more PowerPoint slides. ^)^
Jun
11
revised How do you come up with a fictional character name in a historical era/region?
added 3409 characters in body
Jun
11
answered How do you come up with a fictional character name in a historical era/region?
Jun
6
comment Write a 1st person story with a 3rd person narrator
To see this done well, I suggest reading Tom Robbins' Another Roadside Attraction, which starts with an omniscient narrator who at a point in the book actually becomes the first-person narrator, actually made flesh as a character in the book. It is a kind of god-the-father/god-the-son parallel, and very funny in context. A great use of voice and POV shift.
Jun
5
revised It is unprofessional to use double exclamation marks and CAPS in a product or service?
of => off
Jun
4
comment It is unprofessional to use double exclamation marks and CAPS in a product or service?
@Ralph: I think you missed the "n" in "never". Lauren Ipsum is a careful writer, and got it right the first time. :)
Jun
4
answered It is unprofessional to use double exclamation marks and CAPS in a product or service?
Jun
2
comment Writing about drug induced hallucinations and paranoia
@One Monkey: I never said one is "rendered incapable of talking about it"; I'm talking about treading lightly in areas where you have no first-hand knowledge. In such cases you don't know what you don't know, so you may fail in ways you cannot foresee. That's all.
Jun
2
comment Writing about drug induced hallucinations and paranoia
@Craig Sefton: NOAD: "authentic ... • based on facts; accurate or reliable" — So forgive me if I use accurate as a synonym for authentic. BTW, authentic also means "of undisputed origin; genuine"; so let's not try to hide behind semantics here. I stand by what I said. You may disagree, but please don't pretend I do not mean what I say.
Jun
2
comment Writing about drug induced hallucinations and paranoia
@Craig Sefton: "You may lend your work more authenticity ..." That is precisely my point. There is a tipping point with authenticity, which if you fall below results in complete collapse of the old willing suspension of disbelief.
Jun
2
comment Writing about drug induced hallucinations and paranoia
I'm talking about technical details of feeling. Men can write women (and vice versa), but you will not see them describing, say, premenstrual emotional and physical discomfort, at least in a very detailed way. I have read very good attempts by women to write men in the first person, but even these have failed hugely in some passages. I'm thinking of Tana French's In the Woods, a police procedural/romance written from the POV of a male detective writing in the first person. The book is excellent, and French is a very talented writer. And she mostly pulls it off. But not all the time.
Jun
2
answered Writing about drug induced hallucinations and paranoia
Jun
2
comment Is it easy to change genre?
Homer's "Illias"? Really? The Iliad and The Odyssey are epic poems, and existed long before any notion of literary genre even existed. They were not even considered fiction in their day, but a grand account of noble deeds, i.e., a history.