1,691 reputation
15
bio website
location Maryland, United States
age 49
visits member for 10 months
seen 4 hours ago

scientist/engineer (condensed matter physics, photonics, biology)

not professional programmer, but experienced in Fortran, Matlab, VisualBasic

science fiction author


4h
reviewed No Action Needed What techniques can be used to describe a character's terror?
4h
reviewed No Action Needed Does this sentence convey this image?
4h
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Suggestions for revising style and cadence within a children's book
11h
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
3) I never said H broke a hard-fast GRAMMAR rule. There are many WRITING "rules" that have nothing to do with grammar rules. Notice the quotes. You are grasping at straws. 4) In any case, my example does not change my question, which I maintain is a perfectly valid one for this site. It is no more general than MANY other questions that have been allowed. For example, see one of the top related questions, just to the right of mine: writers.stackexchange.com/questions/761/…
12h
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
1) Chpt 17 is in past tense. Then 18: "Judge Pyncheon, while his two relatives HAVE fled away with such ill-considered haste, still SITS in the parlor, KEEPING house, ...." I never said the tense changes were inexplicable and without purpose. H switches here to give an immediacy to his narration. 2) Also, I said that chpt 18 was the most glaring. There are many other tense shifts like this, even within a single sentence, throughout the book (although less dramatic). You'd know that if you had bothered reading the book.
22h
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
@what: 1) When Hawthorne does it, his intent is to be jarring. And I think the novel in question can be considered a success. 2) As the most glaring example, chapter 18, "Governor Pyncheon," is in the present tense, while most of the novel, as you point out, is in the past tense.
2d
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
Too broad for small minds.
2d
asked Is there a better quote about writing?
2d
reviewed No Action Needed Can't write, can plan
2d
reviewed No Action Needed How to format a novel synopsis
2d
reviewed No Action Needed How to format a novel synopsis
2d
reviewed No Action Needed Suggestions for revising style and cadence within a children's book
2d
reviewed Reopen Using a Modified Picture from Wikipedia in a Publication
Jul
25
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
I guess "Ulysses" by Joyce qualifies. It is famous, and its stream-of-consciousness "plot" certainly breaks lots of rules. And it has sold many copies. But how many people actually read it all the way through, because they wanted to? It started as a short story, and it worked well. Then it turned into a tome. OTOH, a lot of literary critics rate it as one of the greatest books ever, so that's another measure of success (FWIW).
Jul
25
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
So, this would be a counter-example to my question. Here we have a knowledgeable reader (you) and a good author (Baudino). But this book turned you off with its rule-breaking, and didn't sell well, and didn't become well-known. That is what one would have expected. That is why the "rules" exist.
Jul
25
comment Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
It's not answerable with a single answer, true, but it is answerable. And the answers are supposed to be restricted to "successful" books, so that's not open-ended. And people are supposed to explain how the novel broke rules, so I'm not just asking for a list. Having said all that, I'm not married to the current wording. At the root of the question is my wondering how strongly a skilled author can break the rules (and still be successful). Readers accept misdemeanors for the sake of effect. How often do they accept felonies? Or even, crimes of the century?
Jul
25
asked Examples of Successful Rule-Breaking in Novels
Jul
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Pros and cons of using real brand/company names?
Jul
17
comment Typical Fairy-tale Story Especially Princess Stories
Also check out tvtropes.org, which will undoubtedly have tropes about princesses. Note that tropes are not necessarily bad, if you are aware of them and use them to your (and your readers') advantage.
Jul
17
comment Necessary online resources while writing: too much versus too little
I can't be online while writing. No self control. To add to what CLockeWork said, I try to not even look back at previous chapters while writing new stuff, because I start editing the old stuff instead. So if I forget the name I had for something/someone/somewhere, I put in a placeholder. Sometimes I'll go so far as to write the new scene/chapter in its own document.