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The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — it's the difference between a lightning bug and the lightning. — Mark Twain

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1d
comment What software is good for writing a technical book?
Hi, and welcome to Writers. This is way too broad as written. You're asking for four things just in the title of the question, and "general recommendations" is too broad all by itself. Pick one thing you want to ask about; it looks like software is what you want to focus on.
1d
comment Story without any character development whatsoever?
This is actually a great example. Maybe it's one of the reasons I couldn't stand the show either; you had four horrible people who never got any less horrible.
2d
comment Is CreateSpace 100% free for self-publishing?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about how Amazon works.
Sep
17
comment Story without any character development whatsoever?
@Standback Yes, that I'll grant you.
Sep
17
comment Capitalization with compound nouns starting with a number
If you're using sentence case, then I would go with your interpretation; the first item takes the capital. However, I would spell out "Four" in prose, and I'd even spell it out in the table heading if you have room.
Sep
17
comment Story without any character development whatsoever?
@Standback ACD's Sherlock Holmes does not lack character development. The man who meets Dr. Watson in The Sign of Four is not capable of the emotional outburst in "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs" when Watson is injured and Holmes fears for his life. And if he never changed or developed, he wouldn't be willing to settle down and retire to Sussex to keep bees; he'd continue to try to solve crimes from Baker Street regardless of age or infirmity. He may not change much, but he changes.
Sep
16
comment Story without any character development whatsoever?
Related, nearly a duplicate: writers.stackexchange.com/questions/2920/…
Sep
16
comment Capitalization with compound nouns starting with a number
Are you using title case or sentence case?
Sep
16
comment Can a sentence start with verb?
This really belongs on English, not here.
Sep
13
comment Is it bad to include subplots that don't push the story forward?
@BroSlow Because literary tastes change. What was popular and interesting 200 years ago may or may not be "what sells" today. Standards and reader expectations are different. The book may still be great, but if the author tried to publish it today, it would never get out of the slush pile. @ what is just giving context: 200 years ago you had more room for meandering sub-plots because that's how most books were written; today they are not.
Sep
12
comment Is it bad to include subplots that don't push the story forward?
Or as a collection of related short stories published or posted independently of the book.
Sep
12
comment Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
And how would you know if an atheist can write successfully about Christians or not? How would you know the religion or lack thereof of any particular author if it's not advertised? You don't have to follow a belief to write about it successfully. And the reverse isn't true either, as you post: Nathaniel Hawthorne was a Christian, and wrote about Christians in his stories who are horrible people who should never be emulated.
Sep
12
comment Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
Writers do not have to make their characters relatable, or inspiring, or "living lives the audience would want." They do have to be interesting. I found Eragon to be extremely badly written and boring; I couldn't get more than a quarter of the way through. "Special bond with the dragon" or not, likable or not, I wasn't interested in the guy, so I stopped reading.
Sep
12
comment Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
By the way, "Christianity" and "Christianism" aren't the same thing. "Christianity" is the general umbrella term for the religion which worships Christ, regardless of flexibility or orthodoxy; "Christianism" is the fanatic evangelist fundamentalist version which wants to dictate that everyone else should live under their strict and particular interpretation of their religion, enforced by civil law and jail time.
Sep
10
comment Killing the protagonist - should it be done?
Bridge to Terabithia still has the power to rip my guts out even as an adult. What a great book. That and Charlotte's Web are excellent examples.
Sep
10
comment Killing the protagonist - should it be done?
@TommyMyron Now I follow you. The upshot is that there are several ways you can make sure the reader is still interested in the book despite the death of the hero. Read the answers here for suggestions.
Sep
10
comment Killing the protagonist - should it be done?
@TommyMyron 1) you're contradicting yourself in your comment; in one sentence you want to kill the hero and in the next sentence killing the hero will destroy the novel. I don't know what you intend. 2) If someone is taking the hero's place, then whoever or whatever your new protagonist is must also be worthy of the reader's time and attention. So you have to develop your second (not secondary) protagonist, either before or after the first one dies.
Sep
8
comment Person who invented “formula” for good poetry
Perrine gets surprisingly good reviews: amazon.com/Perrines-Sound-Sense-Introduction-Poetry/dp/…
Sep
7
comment Person who invented “formula” for good poetry
If you haven't watched Dead Poets Society, you really really should. The entire point of that scene was to show that you cannot, in fact, reduce poetry to formula.
Sep
7
comment Person who invented “formula” for good poetry
Are you talking about the famous J. Evans Pritchard quoted in Dead Poets Society? emptymirror.livejournal.com/84005.html