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The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — it's the difference between a lightning bug and the lightning. — Mark Twain

Editor for Hire! laurenipsum47@gmail.com


May
30
reviewed No Action Needed Do Writers Use LaTex/TeX for writing?
May
30
reviewed Looks OK How can I write better code-based reference documentation for programming interfaces?
May
29
comment Demo data in screenshots! What are the best practice?
@PraveshParekh eh, the section about the example IP addresses is interesting, but I think a bit specialized. And if you're clever enough to come up with fun fictional names like Dewey Cheatham & Howe, you hardly need my examples above.
May
28
comment Hyphen or en-dash
@nicoX The file name is irrelevant; it can have whatever characters you like. You can label your file Ralph-The&Sentinent@Head$Of%Lettuce^.doc if it helps you keep track of it. We're only discussing the title of the piece as others see it.
May
27
comment Hyphen or en-dash
@nicoX Why do you have to say that it's a report? Would someone otherwise confuse it with a tomato? Unless there's some compelling contextual reason to label it Report — for example, in a bound book of long pieces of writing, or a magazine of reprints, a reader might reasonably wonder whether yours might be a blog post, a white paper, a dissertation, a rant, or an editorial — adding "Report" is redundant and unnecessary.
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
Leave it. No need to scrub history. We learn from mistakes too. :)
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
You could also write that second example this way: JOHN: Looked you up online last night. SHERLOCK: And? JOHN: (makes a you-have-to-be-kidding-me face) SHERLOCK: What? This exactly the same result, just making the expression more explicit, although it does not give camera direction.
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
But compare: JOHN: Looked you up online last night. SHERLOCK: And? (off John's expression) What? In this case, Sherlock speaks, the camera shifts to focus on John, we see John make a face -- although he doesn't speak -- and then the direction is for the camera to leave John's face as the last moment in the beat and shift to Sherlock's next word, which is his reaction to John's expression. The scriptwriter is giving direction to the camera without giving Sherlock a new line.
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
Yes, that is a wrong interpretation in this context. Something happening "out of frame" (so, not visible) might be marked as (off). For example: JOHN: How about we take this case? SHERLOCK (off): Bo-ring. In that line, (off) indicates that what we see (what is on-camera) is only John. Sherlock is speaking, in some other part of the room, and we hear him, but he is "off-camera," so we don't see him.
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
"Off Jesse, maybe just now beginning to see the light..." means that the camera lingers on Jesse's face for five seconds so we can see and understand his expression, and then changes to a new scene. Again, it's an editing/camera direction to indicate "this is the last visual before the next beat."
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
Yeah, sorry, you're completely misinterpreting this "off." The glossary you link to specifically punctuates it as (off). That does mean "offscreen" or "offstage." This one doesn't.
May
27
answered What does “OFF” mean in a script?
May
26
answered How should you format short speech by consecutive speakers?
May
26
answered Hyphen or en-dash
May
24
comment What are PoD options for a 5M Bible?
Change one of your givens. Why does it have to be a single behemoth volume? Why settle for CreateSpace's restrictions? (There are other PoD shops like Xlibris and Lulu.) Could you print it in sections with a really wide left margin (like 1.5") and find a way to spiral-bind it so it can lie flat?
May
24
comment How to show that something is different than in real life?
Excellent; very well put. Great examples.
May
24
awarded  Enlightened
May
24
awarded  Nice Answer
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
@what then you really have to define that in your question above. Nobody else is using that definition of "flaw," and you're not going to get the answers you're looking for.
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
@what So you're saying that there are no possible extenuating circumstances under which a gentle person might break and become a killer, despite having no predilection to killing before the event? Does the little old nun who beheads zombies after the zombie apocalypse have "a hidden flaw, weakness, or vice which offered a foothold for evil to infect her"? Or is that gentle person using her strength and compassion to keep an orphanage from becoming a zombie incubator? You're really painting things in black and white, and neither life nor fiction are that tidy.