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May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
Yes, that is a wrong interpretation in this context. Something happening "out of frame" (so, not visible) might be marked as (off). For example: JOHN: How about we take this case? SHERLOCK (off): Bo-ring. In that line, (off) indicates that what we see (what is on-camera) is only John. Sherlock is speaking, in some other part of the room, and we hear him, but he is "off-camera," so we don't see him.
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
"Off Jesse, maybe just now beginning to see the light..." means that the camera lingers on Jesse's face for five seconds so we can see and understand his expression, and then changes to a new scene. Again, it's an editing/camera direction to indicate "this is the last visual before the next beat."
May
27
comment What does “OFF” mean in a script?
Yeah, sorry, you're completely misinterpreting this "off." The glossary you link to specifically punctuates it as (off). That does mean "offscreen" or "offstage." This one doesn't.
May
27
answered What does “OFF” mean in a script?
May
26
answered How should you format short speech by consecutive speakers?
May
26
answered Hyphen or en-dash
May
24
comment What are PoD options for a 5M Bible?
Change one of your givens. Why does it have to be a single behemoth volume? Why settle for CreateSpace's restrictions? (There are other PoD shops like Xlibris and Lulu.) Could you print it in sections with a really wide left margin (like 1.5") and find a way to spiral-bind it so it can lie flat?
May
24
comment How to show that something is different than in real life?
Excellent; very well put. Great examples.
May
24
awarded  Enlightened
May
24
awarded  Nice Answer
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
@what then you really have to define that in your question above. Nobody else is using that definition of "flaw," and you're not going to get the answers you're looking for.
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
@what So you're saying that there are no possible extenuating circumstances under which a gentle person might break and become a killer, despite having no predilection to killing before the event? Does the little old nun who beheads zombies after the zombie apocalypse have "a hidden flaw, weakness, or vice which offered a foothold for evil to infect her"? Or is that gentle person using her strength and compassion to keep an orphanage from becoming a zombie incubator? You're really painting things in black and white, and neither life nor fiction are that tidy.
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
@what I also find it interesting that you phrase it as "A flawless protagonist would impersonate an ideal I could aspire to," although I don't know if English is your first language. To impersonate means "to fake, to pretend to be." You're saying your ideal protagonist would only pretend to be your ideal.
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
@what why would your ideal protagonist have to be flawless to be "a happy person leading a happy life," or to "competently and successfully deal with life's small and large catastrophes, etc."? Why couldn't a flawed person be happy and succeed over adversity? Do you think the presence of a "flaw," however you define it, automatically makes a person miserable and a failure?
May
23
comment Using pictures in my memoir
Hi, and welcome to Writers. We are not lawyers in general or copyright lawyers in particular, and I think you will need to consult one for an answer. There are nuances to fair use, model release, Creative Commons, and royalty-free photography which we can't advise you on.
May
19
comment Creating Dialogue
Hi, and welcome to Writers. Stack Exchange is not like other boards. We aren't a discussion board. We require clear, practical questions which have the potential to help others. As written, your question is too broad. What kind of problems are you having? Do the people sound stilted? Bookish? Can you post a short excerpt and point to three things you're struggling with? Also, please look under the dialogue tag on the site and see if any of the questions previously asked can help you. writers.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/dialogue
May
15
comment Storyboard a Novel?
I didn't downvote you, if that's what you mean. I would never DV for a comment like that.
May
15
comment Storyboard a Novel?
I have to disagree with you on the LOTR movies. If I hadn't seen the movies, I couldn't have understood the books the first time I read them. Now that I've read the books six or seven times, the movies add to the texture and grandeur of the story. They are not "shallow abbreviations.*
May
15
comment Is it OK to have two different POVs in a same paragraph (third-person omniscient narrator)?
@AlexandroChen "Kuo had noticed that, unlike most girls, she liked to travel light..."
May
14
comment Is it OK to have two different POVs in a same paragraph (third-person omniscient narrator)?
I would buy this, now that you've pointed it out. I think Alex would have to tweak it just a little so that the reader would know that this was still Kuo's thought about her, though.