31,538 reputation
32992
bio website
location Etaoin, SH
age
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 1 hour ago

The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — it's the difference between a lightning bug and the lightning. — Mark Twain

Editor for Hire! laurenipsum47@gmail.com


Feb
22
comment What software do you use for writing and then structuring a book?
Yep, sometimes actual notecards on an actual corkboard is the way to go. You can even connect them with string to see how your plot flows and how scenes affect one another.
Feb
22
answered Writing from the middle
Feb
22
comment Writing from the middle
The idea that "the story will necessarily be inauthentic if I already know what is going to happen" makes me laugh. My stories could not be authentic if I didn't know what would happen, in very great detail, before I ever booted up Scrivener. But that's my workflow, which is neither better nor worse than yours or anyone else's. The OP may or may not find your advice useful, but please don't make pronouncements about how every single writer's process must match yours or it's "inauthentic."
Feb
22
comment Writing from the middle
I won't downvote just on this one bit, but do understand that not everyone uses the "jump in at the middle" workflow. I have the opposite problem: great openings, great endings, very hard to connect the two. And while "discovery writing" (aka pantsing) may work for you, I literally couldn't write that way. There should be some discovery in a first draft, but I couldn't even begin without a thorough outline and extensive character studies. I had better damn well write out "the inner logic out of which the narrative arises" ahead of time, or I personally couldn't write my book. (cont'd)
Feb
22
reviewed Approve Writing from the middle
Feb
21
answered Punctuation and capitalisation in poetry
Feb
20
answered How do I cite well known historical works?
Feb
19
comment Flashback or dream as a means of hinting at more going on than meets the eye
If you are setting a chunk of text in italic to indicate a hallucination or dream state, you can violate a lot of typographical and narrative conventions. It can be stream-of-consciousness, running back and forth from thoughts to narration, it can be disjointed, it can be non-linear, incoherent, etc. Normally yes, when you emphasize something italic you put it in book text, but in this case I actually wouldn't, to emphasize the odd mental state.
Feb
19
comment Flashback or dream as a means of hinting at more going on than meets the eye
I'd call that more of a hallucination or a waking dream. She's not asleep and in REM state. She's unconscious because she was knocked out and injured. I can see how she can be playing back a bit of memory which gets jumbled as she comes back to awareness, and then reality filters in. But that is not a flashback or a dream, strictly speaking. In any case, you could still treat it as regular text or put it in italics, and then we'd have to see how it actually unfolded to tell you whether it worked.
Feb
19
revised Flashback or dream as a means of hinting at more going on than meets the eye
deleted 22 characters in body; edited title
Feb
19
answered Flashback or dream as a means of hinting at more going on than meets the eye
Feb
18
reviewed Reject How to write a polite reminder email?
Feb
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
15
comment Software to change American punctuation to British
Wow, that would be nice. I suggest you find an editor on the correct side of the pond and ask him/her to focus just on that. A native speaker/reader/writer is going to find that sort of thing fairly quickly, because the non-native bits will jump out.
Feb
15
comment What makes good writing software?
What's "tooling vs. immersion"? A full-screen writing environment?
Feb
15
answered Proper use of the “historical present tense”
Feb
15
answered What makes good writing software?
Feb
13
comment How to have a character be nameless for the first few paragraphs of a book?
You can probably put it on GoogleDocs and provide a link in chat, if you're just sharing it to share.
Feb
13
comment How to have a character be nameless for the first few paragraphs of a book?
@C.A.McCann Aw, thanks. Peony is a particular favorite of mine. His friends call him The Boog.
Feb
13
comment How to have a character be nameless for the first few paragraphs of a book?
Yeah, what he said!