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The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — it's the difference between a lightning bug and the lightning. — Mark Twain

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Jan
3
comment Researching sensitive subjects
Yes, true. But that was the example given, so I addressed it. The OP already knows that you have to go to the source for research. Without other examples of sensitive subjects, I can't offer other advice.
Jan
3
answered Researching sensitive subjects
Jan
3
comment Researching sensitive subjects
What country do you live in? That may affect the advice given.
Jan
2
answered avoiding making all your characters sound the same
Jan
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How does one write a character smarter than oneself?
Jan
2
answered Is it a bad idea to vary the voice of the narrator in third person (limited omniscient)?
Jan
1
answered Combatting Excessive Familiarity Of Writing
Jan
1
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What are good places to post your work where it will be read by others?
Jan
1
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What's the significance of ancient mythology in literature?
Jan
1
comment How many commas is too many?
+1 for the term "gapping comma." I didn't know that had a specific name. I love this place. :D
Dec
31
answered What does a typical creative writing course look like?
Dec
30
comment What does a typical creative writing course look like?
What country are you referring to?
Dec
29
answered Is it a bad practice to occasionally add first-person narrative to third-person narrative?
Dec
27
comment A cross-[What] kind of romance?
I think "cross-carbon" finally sold me. I'll add your name to my list of acknowledgements. :)
Dec
27
accepted A cross-[What] kind of romance?
Dec
27
comment alternatives to “he said” in dialog
So long as you use them sparingly and when they add meaning rather than mere variety. I quite like bookisms and adverbs, although I know many posters here don't. :)
Dec
27
comment Switching from past to present tense?
Yes and no. If you begin in medias res, then the reader knows that somewhere near the end, John is going to end up next to a pool with a vest full of Semtex strapped to him. If you begin at the beginning, we don't know about the Semtex, the bad guy, or even the pool. So anyone could end up anywhere doing anything. On the other hand, if we begin at the pool, then every time a pool is mentioned, or John leaves the room, we might freak out wondering if THIS is the moment. So both techniques could work, but I prefer the former.
Dec
27
comment Switching from past to present tense?
1) Because it might not be obvious, especially if you open the book with a flashback. How are we supposed to know we are "flashing back" to childhood and that the "present" narrator is an adult if the first chapter starts with a child? 2) There's a fine line between "let the reader figure it out" and "making the reader struggle to figure out what's happening." I may want my readers to wrestle with moral issues, but I don't want them to fight for location and time. Which see Jay's answer.
Dec
27
comment alternatives to “he said” in dialog
Don't be too afraid of "said." It becomes invisible after a while. That sounds odd, but trust me, it's true. You don't want to overdo it, as you rightly demonstrated, but it's not terrible as a fallback.
Dec
26
revised Intellectual Property Rights & Reuse of the Written Material
edited tags