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 Yearling
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Jun
2
revised Using Pronoun 'It' repetitvely for emphasis?
Removed call for general critique to keep question on-topic
Jun
2
comment Using Pronoun 'It' repetitvely for emphasis?
Also, I've editied out the part of your question where you ask for general feedback as we don't critiques here (please take our tour for more info on on-topic questions)
Jun
2
comment Using Pronoun 'It' repetitvely for emphasis?
All rules can be broken for a given effect (if you know the rules in the first place) and in this case each It becomes an emphatic term, like a politician slamming his fist on the podium for each sentence. If that's what you're trying to achieve then it works very well.
Jun
1
comment How important is being well read for a writer
Perhaps a better aproach is to target what you read; read books that are similar in style to what you're writing, for inspiration if nothing else.
Jun
1
comment How important is being well read for a writer
“If you don't have time to read, you don't have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” - Stephen King
May
28
awarded  Yearling
May
26
revised Would the Following be Correctly Formated?
added 37 characters in body
May
12
comment “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
Which only exacerbates the issue, if there is no consistency between media types. I have to stand by my position, I've seen enough examples from enough publishers, to be confident in it. However, as I've said, the rules may be applied more stricktly with different genres and publishers. So perhaps the answer should be that in some cases they are used as such.
May
12
comment “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
Ah, OK, that makes life easier; turns out I have the Bone Clocks on my Kindle, just haven't read it yet! It's all from one perspective, I haven't found any asterik breaks yet, only standard scene breaks, and they're used at the logical end of a scene, whether skipping ahead in time, or just closing a door.
May
12
comment “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
@what, you seem to believe that I'm attacking your answer. I do not agree with your answer, but instead of simply saying I think you are wrong (which would not be constructive) I am trying to confirm the validity of it one way or the other. Sure, in "recent books I've read" I've seen it the way I say, but that is around 5 books so far this year, 40 last year. This would also be why I said perhaps it's genre specific, as I know we read very different genres. Still, give me an hour or so and I'll look through the books on my Kindle.
May
12
comment “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
Alexandro's examples are from one book. With that sample size they only prove that the author has a particular way of doing things. What I meant was can you try and validate your claim on a more relevant scale; as I said, I've never seen them used like you say, perhaps it's genre specific.
May
12
comment “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
Could you give some examples please, @what? In the books I read, a line break signifies any logical break in a scene and asterisks are only used if a scene change occurs at the end of a page.
May
11
revised “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
Added proper carriage return break
May
11
comment “Empty-space” vs “three-dot” scene break
Author's choice! But for the most part, I only see markers used between scene changes when the change happens over a page, so it's hard to tell that it was a scene change otherwise.
May
11
reviewed Reject How to write a polite reminder email?
May
7
comment Does this read as archaic?
Archaic aside, it's unreadable. If you haven't already, try reading the first sentance out loud.
May
6
reviewed Reject How do I tell my short story?
May
6
reviewed Edit Can I use real presidents (past and present) and real companies in a fictional story?
May
6
revised Can I use real presidents (past and present) and real companies in a fictional story?
Edited "in" OP's comments per Monica's suggestion.
May
1
reviewed Approve Very simple markup language for writing fiction