523 reputation
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location Atlanta, GA
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visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Sep 26 at 17:18

I am a former Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician who now lives in Atlanta and works as a computer programmer. Along the way I've qualified and volunteered as an EMT(Basic), gotten a Masters in forensic science, and qualified as a Professional Engineer in the state Georgia (Fire Protection). I am currently in last year of law school and hope to get a job in the prosecutor's office.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
5
awarded  Revival
Apr
30
answered Legal effect of standard fiction disclaimer
Mar
4
awarded  Yearling
Dec
12
comment Good idea to describe the heist place before the heist begins?
You have to make sure your focus is on the primary plan for the deviation to be surprising. Don't include a detailed description of a pseudo-random side corridor or the reader is going to see the swap a mile away. Also, it might be in your best interest to describe the 'new' pathway as the character encounters it, since it will be new to him, too. He comes to an never-before-seen intersection and has to make a decision; describing the intersection chops up the flow of action for the reader the same way. If he blows through the intersection on instinct, a similarly brief description works.
Dec
12
answered Can this statement be simplified, and is it effective?
Aug
12
answered Would it be annoying for the reader if the all the scenes alternate between “present” and flashback?
Aug
6
awarded  Critic
Aug
6
comment Legalities about fictionalizing current events
To avoid running afoul of this ruling, you only have to do one of two things. One, make the character inherently different from the real individual. For example, create a game player with Keller's stats, but a different background, appearance, and jersey. The second approach is to take a different but identifiable person and put them in a vastly different environment. So, football player number 9 from XYZ, Kansas, and how he reacted to the alien invasion.
Aug
6
awarded  Commentator
Aug
6
comment Legalities about fictionalizing current events
This case has a fairly narrow ruling in that it involves taking a readily identifiable public figure and depicting them in the exact environment for which they are famous. For example, in Keller, a EA wrote a football video game that used the likeness, background, jersey number, etc. of a college football player. The court's ruling ensures that if someone is going to benefit from that likeness, it should be the player himself, not the third party EA.
Aug
6
comment Legalities about fictionalizing current events
Your link doesn't include the case name, which is always a red flag in any article about a legal case. The opinion is IN RE: NCAA STUDENT-ATHLETE NAME & LIKENESS LICENSING LITIGATION, the case is Keller v. EA out of the 9th circuit.
Aug
2
answered Legalities about fictionalizing current events
Jul
17
answered permission to use emails from famous deceased person
Jun
28
answered Design stories with techniques from other creative processes
May
28
comment Is dialogue in a novel necessary, or just padding?
Isn't most of any story 'padding' in this sense? Why sit through four hours of Titanic, you already know the ship sinks (oh, and there's a girl)? It's not 'Robin Hood', it's 'There is a guy who's good at archery and he uses it to rob the rich to give to the poor (oh, and there's a girl).' Gone with the Wind? The South lost (oh, and there's a girl). If it helps you tell the story, it isn't padding. If it really is padding, then it isn't helping you tell the story.
May
20
answered How does one involve people in writing non-fiction?
May
8
awarded  Editor
May
8
revised Is it possible my book could be taken off-line for sale if there is a cease and desist letter?
Quick grammar change
May
8
suggested suggested edit on Is it possible my book could be taken off-line for sale if there is a cease and desist letter?