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visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Nov 24 '13 at 4:06

I have sold science fiction, movie reviews, medical nonfiction, restaurant reviews, and screenplays. I edited and co-wrote a chapter on writing science fiction, published in a popular college textbook on fiction writing (The Graceful Lie, edited by Michael Petracca). I created and co-edited UNEARTH, a science fiction magazine devoted exclusively to discovering and publishing new writers, which launched many writing careers (name-drop: William Gibson). I'm a physician, film director, drummer, scuba diver, and golfer.


Jun
27
revised Is this stylized writing successful or gimmicky?
response to critique
Jun
27
answered Is this stylized writing successful or gimmicky?
Jun
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
comment Can a title be copyrighted?
+1 This is right. In short, you can't copyright a title, but there are other reasons to avoid using one that has already been used.
Jun
13
comment Is it better to omit phrases like: after a moment, after a while, for a moment, etc?
Jay, I agree with this, and gave you an upvote. My tendency, however, is still to try to use some kind of description to convey that nothing happened. "She froze when she saw the stunned looks on their faces. No nerve gas could have paralyzed their expressions more effectively than what she had just said. 'Daddy?' she said hesitantly. Her father shook his head. 'I suppose the wedding will have to wait...." Sure, I'm being a bit silly here, but you see the point.
Jun
13
revised Is it better to omit phrases like: after a moment, after a while, for a moment, etc?
improved typography to clarify meaning
Jun
8
comment The street is filled with cars and people
@sh1ftst0rm Very kind of you. I enjoy setting myself challenges like that!
Jun
5
answered Is it better to omit phrases like: after a moment, after a while, for a moment, etc?
Jun
2
revised The street is filled with cars and people
hugely improved syntax
Jun
2
answered The street is filled with cars and people
Jun
2
suggested suggested edit on The street is filled with cars and people
Jun
2
revised Basing fiction on personal life
corrected grammar and typographical errors
Jun
2
revised Basing fiction on personal life
improved punctuation for clarity; completed a sentence with apparent intended meaning
Jun
2
answered Basing fiction on personal life
Jun
2
suggested suggested edit on Basing fiction on personal life
Jun
2
suggested suggested edit on Basing fiction on personal life
Apr
5
answered How to avoid specifying the gender in English when the original text does not specify it?
Apr
2
comment Words in author's native language?
+1 Agreed. And as for the question about the targeted audience, I would say it's just the opposite: The targeted audience is those who speak the language of the main body of the text. The few words in the other language are in some sense intended to broaden the knowledge and understanding of those reading in the primary language. To be more clear, you may write in English, tossing in some Spanish words to expand the horizons of the English-speakers who are reading your work. (jwpat, I upvoted your answer, but I think the part about not knowing the word is not English is highly unlikely.)
Mar
18
comment Best way to emphasise the greenness of the fields in spring in comparison with summer
You're allowed to be absolutely anything at all, and you are not being unprofessional. Most of all, you're certainly allowed to write your own stories the way you want them to. That's what makes them your stories and not someone else's. So don't misunderstand me. I am NOT trying to rewrite, recast, revise, or do anything else to your story. All we can do on this site is attempt to make some kind of a response that sheds some light on your questions. So when I give you piece of writing, its only purpose is to help clarify my answer by way of example, nothing more.