573 reputation
16
bio website annailonamussmann.blogspot.co…
location USA
age
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen Mar 11 at 15:58

I am an aspiring author with a love for Irish breakfast tea, long walks, period costumes, and tales of the fantastical. I cling to the use of the Oxford comma and I blog about writing and literature at http://annailonamussmann.blogspot.com .


Feb
16
awarded  Yearling
Aug
20
answered Making a female character sound more boyish/masculine
Jul
13
comment What factors in fiction arouse readers' expectations?
I just ran across this article, which seems helpful/relevant in light of your question. lbgale.com/2013/07/02/…
Jul
12
comment Who is the perfect rival to the right-person-wrong-time character in a love triangle?
If readers root for both/either of the romantic rivals all through the story, can you provide a satisfying ending? Usually the protagonist and reader only discover gradually that Mr. Seems-Right is actually Mr. Wrong-Person, right? In that case, the reader is happy with the choice of Mr. Really-Right.
Jul
10
comment Referring to people in a book
I have to admit that as an (American) English-speaker, it jars me to see authors referred to by their first name unless I knew the writer knew them and was telling a personal story. "As Mark said..." (instead of Twain) is so jarring as to seem, to me, pretentious-- which is the opposite of what you are going for.
Jul
9
comment Books for children: complexity
Perhaps so-- but a lot of classic children's books were written for the author's own child/ren or a small group of children.
Jul
9
comment What factors in fiction arouse readers' expectations?
The style of the book can also be part of the "contract." Literary books often close with more unresolved questions than genre books do (plus, if a story seems to be conveying the idea that life is bleak and meaningless, I am less surprised at an unresolved ending).
Jul
9
answered Roadblocks in my story: The Gladys Tribe
Jul
9
answered Books for children: complexity
Jun
6
comment Basing fiction on personal life
I'm glad it did!
Jun
3
comment Basing fiction on personal life
Funnily enough, I don't use caps except for CAN-- for some reason they appeal to me there. My own quirk! :-)
Jun
2
answered Basing fiction on personal life
May
12
comment Placing similes at the beginning and at the end of a sentence
Even before Lauren provided this crime-related example, I thought that the phrase "like a surgeon..." suggested violence (because surgeons cut up bodies, and must remove blood from their hands). If you merely mean that he washed his hands thoroughly in a non-sinister fashion, you probably want to tweak the choice of simile.
May
9
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
2
answered How to come up with a good title?
Apr
19
comment Best practice for stories based on other writers' stories
Apparently Dennis McKiernan originally wrote The Silver Call as a sequel to Lord of the Rings, but because the Tolkien estate wouldn't give his publisher permission to "add on" to Tolkien, he had to change his book so that his world could stand alone.
Apr
18
comment How to advertise a free e-book?
What genre/kind of book is it?
Apr
16
answered Where can I find lists of commonly used words to avoid?
Apr
15
awarded  Commentator
Apr
11
comment 1st person story, but the main character will die in the end and some of the story needs to be told after his death. How to solve this problem?
This framing idea works especially well if the reader expects the central narrator to die (say, in a historical novel about Julius Caesar or Cleopatra), but mightn't it be too much of a giveaway if the death is supposed to be a shocking surprise?