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bio website joezeng.com
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age 20
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen May 24 at 15:47

Feb
27
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
I've seen that page before, and it only further supports the belief that the term "Mary Sue" is nowadays much too overarching.
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
Not really. I was asking whether the notion of a Mary Sue really did have a unified, agreed-on meaning that I simply wasn't aware of.
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
(I'm sure there's a better term than "encloses". It's on the tip of my tongue, but for the love of me, I can't remember what the word is.)
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
I feel like this really is the most workable definition, especially with that concept of "reversed narrative causality", which encloses my "traits for the sake of traits" rather nicely.
Feb
26
accepted Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
"Most descriptions of a Mary Sue are essentially lists of character traits commonly used to prop up a Mary Sue in this manner." And if they didn't do this, maybe our definitions would be more consistent.
Feb
26
accepted Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
Feb
26
comment Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
@ShantnuTiwari, You can write that question. I think it's too far away from what I was asking here.
Feb
26
comment Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
But yeah, this topic will generate way too much discussion. Maybe we should, like, start a chatroom for this topic.
Feb
26
comment Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
Personally, I think that bolting flaws onto a character will not stop them from being "Mary Sues". In fact, bolting too many flaws on a character is also considered a signal of a Mary Sue nowadays. Hence the definition that I now use, "a character that has any traits, good or bad, that are just bolted on for the sake of being there." I find it covers most cases I find, even if I never use the term in any serious way in literary criticism.
Feb
26
comment Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
I can see why this question might not be good for the type of QA that Stack Exchange intends now.
Feb
26
comment Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
@NeilFein Okay. If that's the case, you can close the question if you wish. If I can find an acceptable rewrite, I'll use that instead.
Feb
26
asked Is there any merit to the term “Mary Sue”?
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
^ Mary Sue is used for both genders, while Gary/Marty Stu is exclusively male.
Feb
26
awarded  Scholar
Feb
26
accepted Must every piece of speech get its own paragraph?
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
Of course, in my ventures, I've seen people use the term "Mary Sue" in a way that it need not apply to only those characters that are written as versions of the author.
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
I prefer "Gary Stu" myself. "Marty" sounds androgynous.
Feb
26
revised Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
added 49 characters in body
Feb
26
comment Is there any standardized definition of a “Mary Sue”?
Note: I'm not asking about how to avoid writing them, because I've already learned that writing to deliberately avoid an archetype will only lead to disaster. I'm simply asking about the definition.