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seen Jun 14 at 12:47

Computer engineer: a lot of C, PHP, and Python, plus a bit of lots of other stuff. Linux user. Amateur cryptonerd and general science and math geek.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
11
comment RDF vocabularly for storytelling
Well, that's kind of the point of an RDF vocabulary, to define what terms mean in that context. They don't need to be universally accepted meanings, it's just saying that "when I say X in this context, it means Y". To use your example, there are established RDF vocabularies for biology (e.g., www.obofoundry.org), specifically to avoid the ambiguity you mentioned.
Jun
10
comment RDF vocabularly for storytelling
@NeilFein It may be that there simply isn't enough knowledge of RDF on this site. I believe that with an appropriate background in RDF the question should be quite clear, so if the question is still confusing people it may just be because it is out of place on this site.
Jun
10
comment RDF vocabularly for storytelling
@MonicaCellio By definition, an RDF vocabulary is closer to an encoding than a tool. There may be many tools that support reading/writing/processing a particular vocab, but a vocabulary defines a specific set of relationships between entities, such as the relationships "has name" or "speaks to" or "tries to kill". Yes, it is more often used for nouns, but there is no reason it cannot be used for verbs, I'm just looking for an existing vocabulary that does this.
Jun
10
comment RDF vocabularly for storytelling
@NeilFein Edited. Is that more clear?
Jun
10
revised RDF vocabularly for storytelling
Made question more clear.
Jun
9
revised RDF vocabularly for storytelling
added 2 characters in body
Jun
9
asked RDF vocabularly for storytelling
Jan
4
awarded  Yearling
Jul
12
accepted What's with all the hate on adjectives and adverbs?
Jun
21
comment Creative writing use and abuse
@LaurenIpsum, I think we're both trying to say the same thing. Perhaps I was a bit hyperbolic, but notice I didn't say "throw grammar out the window". Whether it's a skeleton or a guideline, it's still not a rigid set of rules that must always be obeyed. The goal of writing is effective communication: grammar provides hints on how to do that, but I say if you can communicate effectively with your reader without it, then grammar be damned.
Jun
17
comment Creative writing use and abuse
As to the limits of creative abuse of the language: take a look at James Joyce's "Finnegans Wake". Many would argue that it's among the most important literary works of the 20th century and it's all but incomprehensible for its "creative use" of the language.
Jun
17
comment Creative writing use and abuse
For what it's worth, I think native speakers will almost always blow past grammatical errors in literature as well. It's not a recent trend by any stretch, we've all grown up with texts that are thoroughly ungrammatical. Grammar is what you use when you're writing an essay for school. Other than that, I can't really think of a case where applies as more than a general guideline.
Jun
13
comment Finding the 'voice' of a character
I'll just add to this a little: In another question someone suggested "casting" your characters. I.e., pick someone you know, or a celebrity, or even another character you know well to play the role in some hypothetical movie. This can certainly help you get a unique and consistent voice for the character in dialog. I also found that combining the two ideas was useful for developing the character's character: instead of just interviewing the character, I also "interviewed" the actor in the same way. Get to know the actor a little, and more importantly, explore the character with them.
Jun
12
comment Formatting lists for ebook format?
Ah, well if your editor is using an incompatible tool, I suppose your only optiona would be to a) convince them to use a compatible tool, b) give in and use the tool they're using, or c) deal with using different tools. If you really want to use Scrivener and you can't convince your editor to, maybe you can convince them to use Word's change tracking feature. It will definitely be more work for you, but the idea is that when they make edits, you can easily see the changes they made, and then make the same changes to your document in Scrivener.
Jun
11
comment Is it a bad idea to vary the voice of the narrator in third person (limited omniscient)?
I believe Cryptonomicon does this to an extent. Contrast sections regarding Bobby Shaftoe, a US Marine Raider, and those regarding Lawrence Pritchard Waterhouse, a cryptographer and mathematician arguably afflicted with Asperger syndrome. I think it works as fine as long as you're actually shifting your POV (which it sounds like you are), as opposed to just focusing on a different character temporarily, but from the same POV. I think as long as the leader feels like they're looking over the character's shoulder for at least a couple pages, this can work ok.
Jun
11
comment Is it correct to use verbs like “sighed” and “laughed” as dialogue tags?
Strongly agree. For variety, you can also occasionally describe the speakers mood instead of their speech directly, in which case the reader will likely apply the same mood to their speech. For instance, instead of "she sighed" you could try something like "she said, exhausted" or "she said, tired of fighting with him". It serves the same purpose and comes with the same caveats that Lauren already mentioned, it will just give you a little more flexibility to avoid becoming repetitive.
Jun
10
comment Formatting lists for ebook format?
Yes, you should assume that the formatting and layout may change slightly converting from EPUB to Mobi (or vice versa). From what I recall of Mobi, they both use HTML and CSS, but I believe there are slight variations on what they support, so they are not 100% inter-convertible. I get the impression that you really want to use Scrivener: is there something holding you back from that? Whatever tool you use, if it natively supports outputting to your desired format, you should do that rather than output to one format and then try to convert it.
Jun
9
answered How do you keep up with all the ebook formats?
Jun
9
comment Formatting lists for ebook format?
Amazon currently still accepts Mobi format, I think they convert it to KF8 after upload. No idea if they will continue to going forward or not. EPUB is an open and standard and widely supported; this is what tome actually generates. You can find a program called kindlegen from Amazon that converts from EPUB to Mobi. I'm not sure what you mean by format changes: like different file formats? I wrote tome to generate EPUB, and use kindlegen to convert to Mobi. If these stop being widely supported, I'll just have to update tome or use a new tool. But I think EPUB will be around for a while.