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Apr
21
answered Who do I cite as my source?
Apr
17
comment How to name the characters of your story?
Yes. If the characters from the Rothnule race are named Chip, Lar, Blum, and Arbumorpholomerillion -- that screams for an explanation. And it's not just length. How about Chip, Lar, Blum, and Xzyrg?
Apr
17
comment How do I implement a scholarly citation style in an online format?
What What said. Or do you mean that you are not sure how to adapt Chicago style to references TO an online publication?
Apr
17
comment Does it confuse readers if a character name is similar to the name of an object?
I'd think the "she didn't fall far from the tree" line could work quite well as a deliberate quip. The trap is if you start making such ambiguous statements unintentionally and they don't fit the context.
Apr
17
answered Does it confuse readers if a character name is similar to the name of an object?
Apr
17
comment Female Pet Names that a Londoner might use
I once heard a co-worker call his wife "turkey face" over the phone. I can't help but wonder if she actually found that a cute pet name. He did not have any obvious physical injuries the next day.
Apr
17
comment Female Pet Names that a Londoner might use
At first I thought you meant names that a woman would give to her dog or cat. I presume that ambiguity is why you had trouble googling.
Apr
17
accepted What is a productive response to a negative review?
Apr
16
comment Should postal address formats change when translated?
Just curious: What's with the two street names? Is that like, an intersection? Some sort of district or neighborhood? In the U.S. -- and at least several other countries that I've had occasion to send mail to -- addresses are given as number, street name, city, maybe a state or province, and country. Only one street name.
Apr
16
comment What is a productive response to a negative review?
No argument. In my case the negative review was mostly attacking statements of fact, so it didn't particularly hurt my feelings. If the reviewer had said that my writing was unclear or my logic incomprehensible I might have taken it more personally, but at the same time there might have been lessons to learn from it. BTW my daughter (who is an English major in college) proof-read for me before publication and had many harsh comments, which I think I took well. :-)
Apr
16
comment What is a productive response to a negative review?
Thanks. Yes, I definitely understand how "I'd just like to point out some mis-statements" can sound defensive and argumentative no matter how careful you are, which is what has led me to not respond to this negative review so far.
Apr
15
asked What is a productive response to a negative review?
Apr
15
answered Do words like “start”, “realize”, and “decide” add ambiguity to actions?
Apr
15
comment Using a foreign language that uses a different written alphabet
@bobson Yeah, it can be done. Making what A said inferable from B's reply is possible -- I've seen it done a lot with phone conversations -- but when done clumsily can get silly. Like, "Hello, Bob" ... pause ... "You say that Sally lost her job?" ... pause ... "Huh, because she was late for work?" etc. Fill in the other side and the conversation is apparently, "Sally lost her job." "You say Sally lost her job?" "Yes, her boss said he fired her because she was late for work." "Huh, because she was late for work?" Etc. Of course it can be done well, but it's hard.
Apr
15
answered Should postal address formats change when translated?
Apr
15
comment Using a foreign language that uses a different written alphabet
I see you say that it's just two words. But I'd add that including a lot of text in a foreign language -- whether given in the original alphabet or transliterated -- just makes it harder for the reader who does not know that language to follow the story. I've seen this done at times, someone has a French character regularly making statements in French or whatever -- and as I don't speak French it's just annoying. I'm missing chunks of the story. For an exclamation, it's probably obvious in context it's an exclamation, that's probably all the reader needs to know.
Apr
14
comment How to write romance without falling into cliché?
... robot that looks like the most beautiful women I've ever seen but because she's a robot, she's do exactly what I want! I bet lots of men find that an appealing fantasy. A romance with a robot that looks like a person of the opposite sex can appeal to many. A romance with a robot that looks like a metal box ... I doubt it would have much appeal. To some, sure. But not to many. Note that stories of romance with aliens just about always involve aliens that look just like people except for the pointy ears or blue skin or whatever, not tentacled monsters.
Apr
14
comment How to write romance without falling into cliché?
I'll have to look for some actual statistics. RE in love with a robot: I didn't say that people can't relate to a romance where those involved are not exactly like them. The question is how the reader views it. I've never said, "I can't relate because the hero is short and I'm tall" or "because the heroine is black and I've never had a black girlfriend". But there is very little fiction about romances between people and animals, because most people find that idea distasteful. People and robots is, I think, mixed. Some find the idea distasteful, some find it appealing -- like, yeah, a ...
Apr
14
answered How to write romance without falling into cliché?
Apr
14
comment How to write romance without falling into cliché?
Side note: I don't think "boy meets boy" "inspires some of the most popular fiction". It is now an established sub-genre. Few heterosexuals are interested in reading about homosexual romances. Most find them somewhere between grossly immoral and unpleasant. Even those who find them totally unobjectionable don't relate to them.