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Mar
17
comment Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
@MacCooper You're perfectly free to "adapt" quotes. If you substantially change the wording, even if keeping the same idea, then all copyright issues go away. You might still be accused of plagiarism, but plagiarism isn't a crime, it's an academic violation, and if you're writing a novel and not a term paper, that's not an issue. At that point it just becomes a matter of whether you do it well or do it poorly.
Mar
17
comment Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
@MarcWolvesheir But by dropping the "become a monster himself" you've lost all that was clever about the original quote.
Mar
17
answered Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
Feb
25
awarded  fiction
Feb
24
answered Question about longer chapter length flashbacks
Feb
24
answered Referring to characters that are too familiar for a name
Feb
24
comment Does “reversing” characters provide enough of a “disconnect ”to defend against a libel suit?
@dmm But anyway, I don't think you can libel a fictional character. If I accuse Darth Vader of child abuse for torturing his daughter, he can't sue me for libel.
Feb
24
comment Does “reversing” characters provide enough of a “disconnect ”to defend against a libel suit?
@LaurenIpsum I believe in the U.S. a copyright now lasts for life of the author plus 70 years. Anonymous works are good for 95 years from date of publication. That's for things published after 1978, terms before that were much shorter.
Feb
23
answered Does “reversing” characters provide enough of a “disconnect ”to defend against a libel suit?
Feb
20
comment What are the copyright limitations for adopting a ficitonal character's name as your Pen Name?
If it's a word that existed before this writer chose to use it, as LaurenIpsum says, than it has LESS trademark protection, but not none. The words "burger" and "king" were common words before the fast food place came along, but that doesn't mean you could get away with opening your own place and calling it "Burger King". Names with made-up words, like "Linux", have a higher level of trademark protection than names using existing words, but the latter are still protected. That said, I don't know how the law would apply in your case. Which is why I'm posting this as a comment and not an answer.
Feb
16
answered How to write a conversation
Feb
16
answered How can I have my characters do bad things, without sending the wrong message?
Feb
12
answered Is it OK to add chapters to slow down the pace of the story?
Feb
11
comment How do sci-fi stories hold up if their premise or details become discredited?
... down to your writing skill: If you do it well, people will say, Wow, cool, that was a really clever literary device. If you do it poorly, people will say, What a lame literary device.
Feb
11
comment How do sci-fi stories hold up if their premise or details become discredited?
RE deliberately write "retro SF". As someone on here mentioned, there is the whole "steam punk" genre, which isn't exactly retro, but sort of. I recall years ago reading a couple of books that tried to update Buck Rogers by putting in explanations of why the seemingly out-dated technology really would be used in the future, how impossible inventions could work, etc. I'm afraid I forget the titles, but they had "Buck Rogers" in them and were published in the 1980s, I think. I can't think of an example that's really what you describe, but why not? Like many "gimmicks", I think it all comes ...
Feb
11
comment How do sci-fi stories hold up if their premise or details become discredited?
I'm sure that there's technology described in SF stories today that 100 years from now will be considered equally laughable. Of course I don't know exactly what that is. There's an amusing game there. Some simple technologies have been in use for centuries because high-tech solutions are no better. I read an article years ago saying that an example of a perfect technology was the simple mechanical can opener. Sure, you can make it electric, but that doesn't really help much and it makes it non-portable, etc, he went through a whole discussion.
Feb
10
answered How do sci-fi stories hold up if their premise or details become discredited?
Feb
6
answered How do I choose the most appropriate font for a professional document?
Feb
6
answered At what point in editing / revising does one poem become another poem?
Feb
2
answered How to keep going after a failed project?