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Oct
28
answered Can I use real presidents (past and present) and real companies in a fictional story?
Oct
28
answered What are First Drafts, Second Drafts, etc.?
Oct
28
comment What are First Drafts, Second Drafts, etc.?
If you're on you're 4th or 5th draft and you're fundamentally unhappy with the work as a whole, that's very different from you're on your 4th or 5th draft and you realize there's a problem in the transition between chapter 6 and chapter 7 and the character of "Amy" is poorly developed. If you've made several drafts and you are not happy with the overall document, you have to make a decision: was this an idea that just didn't work out and you should just abandon it rather than waste yet more time; or is it a fundamentally good idea and you just need to attack it from a different angle?
Oct
28
comment When is it acceptable to refer to an undefined group of people in academic writing?
This discussion is mixing two very different things together as if they were the same thing: (1) providing evidence to back up an assertion, and (2) making assertions more precise. If I say "60% of Americans do X", that statement could be completely true, even if it turns out that almost all of those 60% are, say, white people. Whether or not the statement is misleading depends on the nature of the sub-group and its perceived relevance to the question. The latter could be highly subjective.
Oct
28
comment When is it acceptable to refer to an undefined group of people in academic writing?
@FumbleFingers Exactly. If you took a survey in which you asked people whether they carpool, and if the overall trend was upward, then it would be perfectly fair and honest to say "more people car pool". If further analysis of the data showed that the increase was greater among bald Chinese accountants, that would be an interesting additional fact, but the statement that "people" are doing this is an honest statement even if one could find diverging trends among various sub-groups.
Oct
11
answered When is it acceptable to refer to an undefined group of people in academic writing?
Oct
7
answered How to make a debate/discussion between characters less dry?
Oct
7
comment How to make a debate/discussion between characters less dry?
RE adding action. Even throw in quick, simple things. "Tony thought a moment. Then he replied ..." Or, "The chaplain laughed. 'Okay, hypothetically.'" Etc. This helps break up the dialog, and gives you an opportunity to make clear who's speaking without endless repetitive "Tony said ..."/"The chaplain said ..."
Oct
7
comment How to depict Australian characters
... commentary, whatever -- then you probably want to exaggerate the stereotypes, at least a little.
Oct
7
comment How to depict Australian characters
That's surely true of writing any nationality, religion, occupation, etc. I often get a laugh out of the depictions of Americans in British TV shows: so often over-the-top brash and arrogant and obsessed with money. I guess that's how the Brits see us. But if you make, say, an Australian talk and act just like an American, that's surely not realistic either. If you're going for realism, you want to make him just distinctive enough to be noticeable without being a caricature. If the point of the story is to point out cultural differences, perhaps for humor, perhaps as social ...
Oct
7
answered Are collection of short stories more likely to sell than single short stories?
Oct
2
answered Is there enough money in writing for me to quit my dead end job?
Oct
1
answered Using pronoun in an essay: 2nd person or 3rd person?
Oct
1
answered Do publishers take the time to look at works from writers who have no qualifications or experience in the industry?
Sep
26
answered Create and using a custom version of a part of an existing mythology
Sep
26
revised Is it permissible to write a short story with little or no dialogue?
whoops, you're -> your
Sep
25
comment Choosing a word according to its length
@PaulA.Clayton Oh, sure. If you're quoting someone, you quote what he said, not what you think he should have said. If you're writing a fictional character, you put words in his mouth that fit the character, not necessarily what you would say. If a character is supposed to be an MBA executive, then yeah, he probably should say "paradigm" and "utilize" and "synergy" a lot.
Sep
24
answered What should I look for or look out for in a publishing deal?
Sep
24
answered Is it permissible to write a short story with little or no dialogue?
Sep
24
comment Is it permissible to write a short story with little or no dialogue?
We regret to inform you that Mr Smithers will no longer be contributing to this site, as he was arrested yesterday for ending a sentence with a preposition. Trial will be held in Third District Grammar Court.