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Oct
16
comment Choice of format for publishing to Kindle
You CAN just send KDP a docx and let them convert, but you can get much more control over the final product by formatting the file yourself. You may be able to get the results you want by careful manipulation of the docx, but it's more direct to learn the format and just do it.
Oct
2
answered Does a writer have any rights to a work that has been completely rewritten by another writer?
Sep
17
answered Mobile writing: can you write substantial works on a Psion palmtop or similar?
Sep
17
answered Story teller dilemma
Sep
17
answered Why does this software suggest capitalizing the word 'dragon'?
Sep
17
comment example of figure of speech that could realistically be confused for a literal statement
Decent one. Yes, I've heard that phrase used both ways.
Sep
16
comment example of figure of speech that could realistically be confused for a literal statement
Oh, I had to read that twice to get it. Cute example!
Sep
16
comment example of figure of speech that could realistically be confused for a literal statement
@Bookeater Sure. I'm looking for examples where someone might realistically, plausibly be uncertain. A different person in the same situation might instantly realize the intended meaning. Certainly someone who had more information could know the intended meaning. But I just need a case where if someone said, "Bob said X and I wasn't sure if he was being literal or figurative", that we wouldn't automatically respond, "Oh come on, obviously he was being literal!" or "... being figurative!"
Sep
8
comment What is the role of memorable lines in movies?
Oh, a computer program could certainly measure compliance with a set of mechanical rules, like counting the number of adjectives per sentence or how often passive voice is used. The question is whether someone could come up with a set of rules of that sort that would really measure "good writing". For example, MS Word will calculate the "grade level" of a document using average word length and number of words per sentence, and I routinely find these ratings to be highly debatable. Using a lot of big words is a FACTOR in making writing difficult to understand, but it's far from the whole story.
Sep
8
accepted example of figure of speech that could realistically be confused for a literal statement
Sep
8
comment example of figure of speech that could realistically be confused for a literal statement
Those are plausible. Thanks.
Sep
7
asked example of figure of speech that could realistically be confused for a literal statement
Sep
2
revised How do you write boy & girl protagonists without turning them into a love story?
added 1714 characters in body
Aug
31
answered Constructed Language - how to spell words that will be mispronounced in English
Aug
31
answered How do you write boy & girl protagonists without turning them into a love story?
Aug
31
comment The “Rules” of Writing
-- Never use a long word when a diminutive one will do. -- About sentence fragments. -- Vague analogies are as bas as, like, whatever.
Aug
31
comment The “Rules” of Writing
Taken too literally, this would preclude most science fiction, as most writers have never been to another planet or travelled in time. :-)
Aug
31
comment The “Rules” of Writing
Isaac Asimov (a well-known sci-fi writer if the name isn't familiar to you) once wrote that when he was writing a story, he always began with a general idea, then came up with an ending, then a beginning, and then worked out how to get from the beginning to the ending.
Aug
31
comment The “Rules” of Writing
I disagree with number 3. I've read stories where it's "Bob said ... Sally said ... Bob said ... Sally said ... Fred said ..." and it's boring and repetitive. But yes, I understand that the opposite extreme, trying to come up with a million different ways to say "said", quickly becomes obvious and distracting. "Bob said ... Sally replied ... Bob interjected ... Sally whispered ... Fred cautioned ..." etc.
Aug
31
comment The “Rules” of Writing
Personally, I think an excellent example of excessive description is Jules Verne. Like in 20,000 Leagues, he was constantly going into long descriptions of the flora and fauna that the heroes saw as they travelled. I don't care. One literary critic commented, "Verne's writing improves the instant you put down the book", which I think was very true. The Cliff notes of Verne's writing tend to be much more interesting than the original.