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 Yearling
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Jan
4
answered Will changing a protagonist into an antagonist alienate readers?
Jan
4
answered It's hard for a foreigner to publish in english?
Jan
4
comment How can I tell if a novel idea is made for a series or a stand-alone?
Sorry, maybe I circled around too much. What I was trying to say was: If the nature of the story is such that it is naturally divided into installment where each installment ends essentially where it began, then this is logically a series. Like a detective story or doctor story or some types of space travel story. If it doesn't logically divide into episodes, or if any attempt to divide into episodes does not result in units that end essentially where they began, than this is not logically a series. Like a romance or war story.
Jan
3
answered How do I structure an essay into a thesis statement and three points in three paragraphs? -this is not a school homework
Jan
3
comment How do I structure an essay into a thesis statement and three points in three paragraphs? -this is not a school homework
Hmm. "This is not homework", but "My teacher wants ..."
Jan
3
answered How can I tell if a novel idea is made for a series or a stand-alone?
Dec
27
answered How many errata are too many?
Dec
27
comment Switching to fiction software
Whoa, but tape decks? Is that some new-fangled replacement for punch cards? :)
Dec
27
comment In English non-fiction, should I try to place the important parts at the beginning of the sentence?
@Wrzlprmft Not really. If we don't put the most important thing last, it doesn't follow that we must put it first. We could put it second or third or fourth, etc.
Dec
26
answered In English non-fiction, should I try to place the important parts at the beginning of the sentence?
Dec
24
comment Swearing in a book, within a context. Too offensive?
@Smoj I agree. As you say, deliberate shock value has diminishing returns: the more it's done, the less effective it becomes. Then you have to ratchet up to the next higher level of shock value. This has the potential to seriously date your work: If society as a whole moves toward accepting higher levels of vulgarity as "normal", then what is shocking today will be humdrum in a few years. If society moves toward more stricter standards, then what was an entertaining level of shock today will be over the top offensive in a few years. Note societies regularly go back and forth on such things.
Dec
24
answered Can I use an old painting of Lilith as my book cover?
Dec
24
answered Swearing in a book, within a context. Too offensive?
Dec
24
comment Swearing in a book, within a context. Too offensive?
@Lostinfrance I thought the original "Battlestar Gallacta" series was rather clever about this. The characters are supposed to be from a culture far from Earth. And so the writers invented swear words like "frak" and "faldercarb". It struck me that viewers could interpret these words as being as mild or offensive as they were comfortable with and as fitted their conception of the characters. One person might interpret "faldercarb" as being equivalent to "bummer man", another to the F-word.
Dec
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
17
comment What is the story structure called when someone doesn't know they have the solution to their problem in hand?
I don't think the names on "TV tropes" are, in general, widely accepted and recognized names for these ideas. Very few sound like the sort of names that literature professors give to such ideas, so I doubt they would be respected in an academic paper. Frankly, I often hear people ask "the name" of some complex idea, or even "the word", and I think the reality is that there are many ideas that do not have a single, recognized name. You have to describe them.
Dec
17
answered An online resource where writers can get quickie answers to questions about the real world?
Dec
16
answered Any techniques to make the reader feel sad and very sorrowful?
Dec
16
comment Any techniques to make the reader feel sad and very sorrowful?
Write a book that is really bad and then charge a lot of money for it. Then when the reader realizes they were ripped off, they will feel very sad and sorrowful. :-)
Dec
15
comment How should I have my male character express strong feelings?
@VilleNiemi RE psychiatrist: For it to work the hero would have to be talking to the heroine's psychiatrist, or would have to be talking to his own psychiatrist about a third person's problems, which may or may not work in the story. It seems unlikely that the woman's psychiatrist would discuss her case with another person -- wouldn't that violate confidentiality? And if it's the heroine who has suicidal tendencies, why would the hero be going to a psychiatrist? Not to say it wouldn't work, but you'd have to come up with a plausible scenario.