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Feb
25
answered Can technical writing suck less
Feb
24
comment Is it common to create a registered company when you self-publish?
Side note: If you're thinking that you can use a pseudonym to protect yourself from libel suits, don't. That's illegal. If someone cares enough, they'll track you down eventually and then you'll be in worse trouble.
Feb
24
comment Is it common to create a registered company when you self-publish?
... you're writing, maybe you don't care if someone learns your real name. But if you're using a pseudonym because you don't want your hordes of screaming fans to harass you at home, your co-workers to know you're writing explicit pornography, or whatever, then don't put your real name in the copyright registrration.
Feb
24
comment Is it common to create a registered company when you self-publish?
In the book, put "(c) 2015 by Mila Haven" (or whatever year and name). Then on your registration form you check the box for "pseudonym", and then either give the author as simply "Mila Haven", or as "Mila Haven, pseudonym for Monique Huber" (or whatever your real name is). Note that if you reveal your real name in the copyright registration, that makes it easier to sue if someone steals your work, etc, but it then becomes public record -- copyright registrations are open to the public. If you're using a pseudonym just because you think it's a "better sounding" name for the sort of book ...
Feb
24
comment Is it common to create a registered company when you self-publish?
I do have a separate checking account for the business. And a business credit card. (With a $20,000 credit limit for a business that has sales of maybe a thousand or two a year! Joke's on the bank!) RE pseudonums: see my update above.
Feb
24
revised Is it common to create a registered company when you self-publish?
added 1950 characters in body
Feb
23
answered Can you sell a book for money while having it published online for free?
Feb
23
answered Is it common to create a registered company when you self-publish?
Feb
19
answered Maybe it *is* better to write rough drafts longhand?
Feb
19
comment Protecting your idea when working with another author
We get a lot of questions like this on this forum. New writers are insanely paranoid that someone is going to steal their ideas. My advice: Quit obsessing over it. Spend your time trying to write something good enough that someone would have a reason to steal it. In this case, if you are convinced that the person you are working with is so dishonest that he is likely to steal your work, I suggest you find a different partner.
Feb
19
answered A character who teaches how to build wealth
Feb
4
comment How many errata are too many?
@SimonWhite Did you read my last paragraph? There's nothing you can do about it, so ... where do you go from there? If the book is unreliable or unreadable, then throw it away. Otherwise, all you can do is put up with it.
Feb
3
revised Is the Concept of “Machine of Death” Copyrighted?
added 696 characters in body
Feb
3
comment Why would an agent request an exclusive submission?
Okay, I see I misunderstood your question. Still, the gist of my first paragraph still applies: The agent has to spend time deciding if he wants to represent you, and he doesn't want to spend a lot of time and then have you go elsewhere. Less of an issue though. I doubt most agents spend months deciding whether to represent a writer. Waiting six weeks to get an answer isn't really very long. I suppose if you have to go through 20 agents before you find one who will take you on, this would add up.
Feb
3
answered Why would an agent request an exclusive submission?
Feb
1
answered Is the Concept of “Machine of Death” Copyrighted?
Feb
1
comment When describing novel word counts to agents / publishers, are chapter titles and epigraphs included?
Before computers, word counts were estimated. You'd take your typed pages, count the number of letters per line, multiply by lines per page, multiply by number of pages, and divide by 6. (6 being taken as the "standard" length of an English word.) You didn't worry about blank spaces on pages or any of that. Because counting the exact number of words in a novel on typed sheets of paper would be a very long and tedious task. Today, a computer can give an exact word count in a fraction of a second. So ... I don't know whether editors today want the old-style estimate or an exact word count.
Feb
1
answered Why do news articles and press releases start with date and location?
Jan
22
answered Where do you do your writing?
Jan
22
answered Showing cultural assimilation