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Dec
1
comment How I should handle gender-neutral pronoun in technical writing?
Good discussion of this here: english.stackexchange.com/questions/48/…
Nov
30
answered What is the best way to avoid plagiarism when importing information from a source?
Nov
30
comment If I write an erotic / porn novel now, what are the chances that it might impact my mainstream writing career?
I'd certainly consider the possibility that someone will figure it out sooner or later. Lots of people have gotten burned because they assumed that no one would ever know they did X because they took some steps to keep it secret.
Nov
25
answered Should I describe my characters going to the toilet?
Nov
25
answered I'm unable to figure out the logical solution to a problem; how do I keep writing?
Nov
25
comment I'm unable to figure out the logical solution to a problem; how do I keep writing?
I'd add that the weakness should be logically related to his powers. Like if you say that the villain can hurl energy beams with incredible power that destroy anything in their path, a logical weakness is that his energy source is limited so after three shots he has to recharge. If you make his weakness that the energy beams don't work if the villain eats a ham sandwich for lunch, with no explanation of why that should be so, and then the hero sneaks some ham into the villain's roast beef sandwich, the reader will likely quickly realize that you just stuck this in to enable the hero to win.
Nov
19
answered Term for stereotype stories
Nov
19
comment Term for stereotype stories
@SystematicFrank "sorry for quoting movies in a writers stack" I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that I suspect these movies all had a WRITTEN script.
Nov
17
comment Two perspectives in a non-fiction book
... and mother relates the same conversation, but with a slightly different memory of the exact words, so the reader can see how they are very similar, could well be two different people's impressions of the same speech, but come across with totally different meanings. My point being, if the story comes down to just daughter mentioning some incidents and mother mentioning other incidents and there's no apparent difference in perspective, there's no point separating it out. Just combine both sets of memories into one narrative.
Nov
17
comment Two perspectives in a non-fiction book
Yes. I think one key is to clearly identify what is from mother and what is from daughter, so the reader doesn't have to figure it out. Whether it's alternating chapters or some smaller unit, just have them clearly labeled. A heading on a page would seem far less redundant than to constantly be saying, "Now from the mother's point of view ..." or other embedded text. I'd think this would be most interesting if there were very different perspectives. Like daughter talks about some event as fun and exciting while mother talks about it as dangerous, etc. Or daughter relates a conversation ...
Nov
16
answered What should you do if the events in your story happen in real life just when you finish writing it?
Nov
16
comment What is the purpose of using Roman numerals as page numbers?
Actually Roman numerals ARE used everywhere. That is, everywhere that there is front matter. I guess you're unlikely to find pages with Roman numerals in a novel because novels don't typically have front matter. But they turn up in all sorts of non-fiction books.
Nov
15
comment Writing figures in novels
In non-fiction, I would certainly write "6'2" tall" and "early 1900's". In fiction, in the narrative, I would still use the numerals. In dialog ... it gets more debatable. If how the person says it matters at all -- like it's a clue in a mystery story or tells us something about the character's personality -- then I'd write it out. I certainly wouldn't write "$200" if I want the reader to read that as "coupla hundred bucks". But I would write "in January of 2012" and not "in January of twenty twelve" unless it really mattered whether the character said "twenty twelve" or "two thousand twelve".
Nov
13
answered Gratuitous use of magic: poor writing and/or unenjoyable?
Nov
13
answered Writing figures in novels
Nov
13
comment Can I use already used fictional language?
@keiths I disagree. See my verbose update.
Nov
13
revised Can I use already used fictional language?
added 3678 characters in body
Nov
12
answered Can I use already used fictional language?
Nov
12
comment what is the best way to make money on the side as a beginning author?
Back when I was writing magazine articles, I once calculated that if you took the money that I was paid divided by the time it took me to write them, I was making about $2 per hour. I'm afraid to even do the calculation for my books.
Nov
12
comment Making modern references
I recall that C.S. Lewis updated his book "The Screwtape Letters" to replace references to World War 2 to simply "the war", so it would be less dated. A reader today who doesn't look at the copyright date might well think "the war" refers to Afghanistan or Iraq. The story is general enough that without the mentions of WW2, it's not obvious when it is set.