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Jun
16
answered How to write when thinking in multiple languages?
Jun
15
answered Feedback: What to use and what to ignore?
Jun
12
answered How to make the reader “accept” absurdity?
Jun
10
answered Copyright of a TV series when used as reference?
Jun
10
answered How to write about transgender issues while avoiding cognitive dissonance?
Jun
8
comment online database of clever phrases
What do you mean, then, when you say that you are looking for "clever phrases", but not "clever quotes"? If someone said or wrote a phrase or sentence, and it's clever, we call it a "quote". Or are you thinking perhaps of phrases too short to be considered a quote, just brief figures of speech or idioms?
Jun
2
answered What is the role of memorable lines in movies?
Jun
2
answered How to “defy” physics on a sci-fi?
May
20
answered General copyright - How much is actually copyrighted?
May
19
comment What “formats” are there for eBooks?
Hmm, that web page is debatable. What is the definition of "e-book format"? I don't think most people would call an MS Word doc file or a plain text file an "e-book format". The author of that page seems to consider any format that can be used to store text on a computer an "e-book format".
May
18
answered Studies of when to kill a character
May
18
answered Should word choice be varied or consistent?
May
18
comment How do I cite an unnamed lecture that took place somewhere in Dade County and was published on YouTube?
... PhD for publication in a scholarly journal must meet more rigorous standards than a paper by a high school student.
May
18
comment How do I cite an unnamed lecture that took place somewhere in Dade County and was published on YouTube?
... In a case like this, a serious researcher would try to find the original source. It's always better to get the original source when possible, because this let's you verify that the quote is not fabricated or taken out of context. (Easier, of course, to alter or fake a printed quote than a video, but a video clip can certainly be out of context, or altered or completely staged.) But if you can't do that -- maybe because the original source no longer exists, or you are unable to track it down -- it is certainly acceptable in scholarly circles to say "as quoted in". Also, a paper by a ...
May
18
comment How do I cite an unnamed lecture that took place somewhere in Dade County and was published on YouTube?
Well, it's an overstatement to say that "YouTube is not a citable source". I made my post above without watching the video -- I was thinking the OP meant that this was a video taken of a contemporary lecture and posted on YouTube, in which case citing YouTube would be fine. If I used a quote from a speech that I found in the New York Times, I would cite the New York Times as the source. If I was quoting from a speech that I saw on CNN, I would cite CNN. The speech here presumably pre-dates YouTube and there is no indication where the footage came from. (Unless I missed something.) Etc. ...
May
15
comment What exactly is the “five (consecutive) word” plagiarism rule?
RE changing one or two words: Yes. If you said "My nation, right or wrong" and presented that as an original quote, I don't think you'd get away with it. But change enough words and at some point you cross the line out of plagiarism. Like I doubt you'd get in trouble for, "I love my nation, even though it has flaws."
May
15
comment How fast do traditionally-published books sell after they have been published?
I don't have any statistics, but it must surely vary between books. I bet many more copies of the Iliad were sold in 2014 than were sold the year it was published. A textbook publisher once told me that textbooks tend to sell slowly at first but can produce steady sales for many years. Your statement might well be true of most light novels. Etc.
May
15
comment How to show characters learning something in a non-boring way?
@AnnaM I've read many novels that include made-up words, especially fantasy and science fiction novels where the writer invents words for things that exist in this world but not in ours. I was thinking once that it would be amusing to write a story where, over the course of the book, you gradually introduce made-up words one at a time, so that the reader barely notices. And then make the last sentence of the book consist entirely of made-up words, so someone who read the last sentence without reading the rest of the book would have no idea what it meant.
May
15
comment Do publishers really need to translate between UK and US English?
Just to be technical, while a prostitute is said to be "soliciting", I have never heard a prostitute called a "solicitor". Bu then, I don't claim to have a lot of experience with prostitutes. :-0
May
15
comment Are there words that are “stronger” than others? If so, why?
@XosMel You want to be a writer and you don't think playing with words is fun?!