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Apr
2
comment How to balance for readers who are not technologically literate
@LaurenIpsum Well, he said there wasn't such a character. It may be that he could put one in just for this purpose. Or it may be that if we read the story we would see that the presence of such a character would be implausible.
Apr
1
comment How to balance for readers who are not technologically literate
@ChrisSunami And viewers of television in general are used to seeing technical jargon thrown out to explain how the scientist knew there would be an earthquake or how the detective found the criminal, etc. Often wholly invented and incoherent to anyone knowledgeable in the field.
Apr
1
answered How to balance for readers who are not technologically literate
Apr
1
comment What are the copyright limitations for adopting a ficitonal character's name as your Pen Name?
Well, I'd just say; I wouldn't. I don't know where you live, but here in the U.S., people who demonstrate extreme devotion to a fictional character are considered very strange and are routinely laughed at.
Mar
31
answered Why are the paragraphs of an document often indented and not vertically separated?
Mar
29
comment How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
@MacCooper Not saying it was a stupid idea. Just that it has a lot of catches. Some of my most brilliant ideas also sometimes have the flaw that they don't actually work. :-)
Mar
27
comment How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
@MacCooper But if "well, that's a translation into English" is considered valid, then you could, say, call a character "John", and say, "Well, that's not necessarily an English name. It could be an English translation of Juan, or Sean, or Jean, etc."
Mar
27
comment How do you convey nonverbal utterances?
That is, don't do anything special. Just use the interjection as a word.
Mar
26
answered How to choose a good/suitable pseudonym
Mar
26
comment How to choose a good/suitable pseudonym
RE #1: Someone who generally writes children's stories, but decides to take a stab at pornography, might well want to use two different pseudonyms (or his real name and a pseudonym). Anyone who knew of the pornography would surely be hesitant to buy books for her children by this author, and people who had heard of the children's books and was looking for porn might think "what sort of sex novel would someone who wrote The Fuzzy Bear Goes to the Park write?" Yes, that's the extreme case, I can imagine wrestling with the question for less divergent genres.
Mar
25
answered How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
Mar
25
comment How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
Interesting thought on surnames, but I think it breaks down. Sure, there are people named O'Higgins in Chile. But they're surrounded by people named Fernandez and Rodriguez and Garcia. If EVERYONE in the story has an Irish-sounding surname, I'm not going to think, "Oh, this could be set in Chile, because there are people there with Irish surnames". Barring explicit information, I'm going to think, "This must be set in Ireland."
Mar
20
answered What are the copyright limitations for adopting a ficitonal character's name as your Pen Name?
Mar
19
comment Least distracting method of citing in a book?
(b) it's not at all clear what would constitute a convincing defense. If someone says, "I don't believe the claims about physics made in this book because the author didn't use the MLA citation style", convincing them otherwise would require a rather radical change of mindset, which would probably take a book in itself.
Mar
19
comment Least distracting method of citing in a book?
This style is unfamiliar enough that you might give a couple of sentences explaining what you are doing and why. I've done that sort of thing in a couple of my books, like including an introductory paragraph to explain why I included "real life" examples of database concepts I'm trying to explain, or why I used a certain translation of the Bible for quotes. But for something like this, I wouldn't see a need to "defend" the choice against potential criticism. If a reader discounts the information in your book because they don't like your citation style, well, (a) that's just silly, and ...
Mar
17
comment Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
@MacCooper You're perfectly free to "adapt" quotes. If you substantially change the wording, even if keeping the same idea, then all copyright issues go away. You might still be accused of plagiarism, but plagiarism isn't a crime, it's an academic violation, and if you're writing a novel and not a term paper, that's not an issue. At that point it just becomes a matter of whether you do it well or do it poorly.
Mar
17
comment Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
@MarcWolvesheir But by dropping the "become a monster himself" you've lost all that was clever about the original quote.
Mar
17
answered Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
Feb
25
awarded  fiction
Feb
24
answered Question about longer chapter length flashbacks