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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
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Sep
15
comment What is a good name for a character who loves money?
I'd avoid giving characters names that too obviously describe them, unless the story is intended to be a comedy or a very blatant allegory. In real life, greedy people are not all named "Mr Cash", violent people are not all named "Mr Fist", etc., and seeing names like that in a story just seems ... silly.
Sep
12
answered Copyright issue when referring to a textbook
Sep
12
revised Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
added 603 characters in body
Sep
12
comment Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
... the idea that someone could say, "I think X is morally wrong, and therefore I will seek to persuade others that it is morally wrong and that they shouldn't do it. But of course I wouldn't make it illegal, because that would violate other people's freedom." Which is, in fact, the position of almost every evangelical that I know personally or who I have heard speak publicly.
Sep
12
comment Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
Can't say I've heard the term "Christianism" before, but hearing it was coined by Andrew Sullivan, who I have heard of, okay, I get it. I think you'd be hard pressed to find many actual Fundamentalists or evangelicals who say they want their religion imposed on others by force of law, that's more a caricature of evangelicals. Best as I can make out Mr Sullivan's logic, he says, "I think that anything I believe to be morally wrong should be illegal. Christians say X, Y, and Z are morally wrong. Therefore, Christians must believe that these things should be illegal." He rather skims over ...
Sep
12
answered Do I risk losing reader if I put too many religious/anti-religious views?
Sep
11
comment Killing off a character: deciding if, when and how
"Imposing an external criteria of good/bad" I think very few stories do not reflect SOME moral viewpoint. In most stories, there is a "good guy" and a "bad guy". The good guy may be flawed, he may not be a paragon of all that is good and right, but he's almost always presented as basically a good and decent person trying to do what is right. Usually, good wins in the end and the reader walks away happy. If the hero loses, this is presented as a sad and tragic thing. Sure, sometimes the writer's idea of "good" differs from my own. But the writer still has a moral viewpoint.
Sep
10
answered What do “p” and “pp” mean in the context of an index?
Sep
9
comment How to write a prophecy?
... Bible has nothing to do with whether you could include such a thing in a fiction story that you are writing.
Sep
9
comment How to write a prophecy?
@dmm The Joseph example is better than the Pharaoh example. There's no indication in the Bible or elsewhere that I know of that Pharaoh knew anything about any prophecy. You could say that his efforts to destroy the Jews backfired when they ended up placing a Jew in the royal household, but it had nothing to do with a PROPHECY. The Joseph case is debatable. I don't know that you'd call Joseph's dreams a prophecy, or that his brothers thought of them as a prophecy and not just their arrogant jerk brother. But maybe. Whatever, whether or not something like this scenario happened in the ...
Sep
8
revised Is it important to describe how the characters are dressed?
added 952 characters in body
Sep
8
answered Is it important to describe how the characters are dressed?
Aug
6
comment How could a criminal forget a crime?
I recall Watson warning Holmes about the dangers of drug abuse, but I forget the details. Been a while since I've read those stories.
Aug
6
awarded  Revival
Aug
5
comment How could a criminal forget a crime?
(Shrug) Not a question that will lead me to challenge you to a duel to the death. It seems to me that a brilliant detective would value his mind highly, and would want to keep it clear and functioning at peak efficiency. Hallucinogenic drugs would seem like the sort of thing a brilliant detective would have no desire to use. I suppose you could make a case that "a mind forever wandering" would try such drugs out of curiosity, but that's not how I recall it presented in the stories. Of course one must also consider that cocaine and heroin use were viewed differently back then. Whatever.
Aug
5
comment How could a criminal forget a crime?
Sure. And I thought it seemed out of character. Of course Holmes was supposed to be .. quirky.
Aug
5
answered How could a criminal forget a crime?
Aug
5
comment How could a criminal forget a crime?
Whether anyone really has committed a murder while sleep-walking, the idea doesn't seem obviously, blatantly impossible. By definition, fiction is not limited to things that you can prove really happened -- that's called "non-fiction". I'm pretty sure that no one has ever actually travelled to the planet Vulcan or survived a total nuclear war, but that doesn't mean you can't include such things in a fiction story.
Aug
4
answered Writing succintly. Does it matter?
Aug
4
comment How should changing the point of view be handled?
Don't rely on subtle clues, like, "Oh, the reader should realize that we're now talking from Sally's point of view because I'm talking about colors and Sally always pays attention to color." Make it 100% clear: Use the character's name or some other blatant identifier.