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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
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visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Jan 23 at 19:20

Dec
9
comment Are 'how-to write fiction' books full of it?
Well, it's certainly true that it would be a very rare person who could read a book on how to do something and then be an expert. I wouldn't want to be operated on by a doctor who had just read a book about surgery and had no other training or experience. But surely on any subject, including writing, there is useful information and advice that the person who is good at it could give to the beginner.
Dec
9
comment Are 'how-to write fiction' books full of it?
There are authors who are paid to write books?! Wow.
Dec
9
answered Are 'how-to write fiction' books full of it?
Dec
9
answered Where can one go to find police procedures
Dec
9
answered What is the benefit of writing formally?
Dec
9
comment What is the benefit of writing formally?
One minor note: "@" is used by accountants and sales people when expressing a quantity and a price or value, especially in a long list. Like if you were listing the contents of a warehouse, you might write "Model 327B, 20 @ $5.50 = $110.00; Model 824X, 32 @ $8.25 = $264.00" etc. That would certainly not be considered formal writing. I agree I can't think of a use for an "@" in formal writing except to express an email address.
Nov
19
revised Demo data in screenshots! What are the best practice?
added 698 characters in body
Nov
19
revised Demo data in screenshots! What are the best practice?
added 698 characters in body
Nov
19
comment Demo data in screenshots! What are the best practice?
@kindall Sure, but be careful clients don't get confused. I once used "Sir Isaac Newton" as a sample name, and the client said that they didn't want "Sir" in front of the name.
Nov
10
comment Use of punctuation within quotes with single words or letters
@LaurenIpsum How would bolding or italics have helped? I suppose you could put the text to type in bold and other text in ordinary weight, so the first period would be bold and the second period would be lighter. But I don't think that would stand out visually very well.
Nov
10
answered Why am I getting so many words per page?
Nov
10
comment Use of punctuation within quotes with single words or letters
I once wrote instructions for use of a software product where I wrote, 'Do not include a decimal point in the number. Don't type, "10."; type "10".' The editor at corporate, following the style guide, put the final period inside the quotes, so it read, Don't type "10."; type "10." Which I'm sure made it completely clear to the reader.
Nov
10
comment Use of punctuation within quotes with single words or letters
I agree that it's awkward and unclear, but that's the "American" convention. The "British" convention is to only put the punctuation inside the quote marks when the punctuation is part of the quote. As an American, it pains me to admit this, but the British convention makes a lot more sense to me. If no one is imposing a style on me, I always use the British style. But of course if you are writing for a publication or for a class that adheres to a particular style guide, you should follow that style guide.
Nov
7
answered What's the difference between purple prose and vividly descriptive writing?
Nov
7
comment Why do heroes need to have a physical mark?
@AE Sure, each character should have a distinctive personality. But I think it would be quite a stretch to suppose that each character's distinctive personality would show through with every word they say or every single action they perform. Stories where the author tries to push that idea -- e.g. EVERYONE has a distinctive accent or way of speaking -- get hackneyed real fast. Giving the reader some convenient tags to distinguish characters seems like a good idea to me.
Nov
7
answered Why do heroes need to have a physical mark?
Nov
7
answered Why write in a different genre than what you read?
Nov
7
comment Is a glossary needed in a novel?
@AE Yes. Like the OP gives the example of "keris", a kind of dagger. If IN THIS STORY there is no particular importance to it being a keris and not any other kind of dagger, I'd just write, "He was stabbed with a dagger" or whatever. If it's important that it's a ceremonial religious item, then I might write, "He was stabbed with a keris, a ceremonial religious dagger." If that's insufficient to make the significance clear, then maybe there's call for a footnote, or for adding a paragraph to the text explaining it.
Nov
4
answered Past tense vs present tense
Oct
27
comment Stories based on news: are they allowed?
Same in the U.S. You can freely write a story "inspired" by a real news story. Just change all the names and shuffle some facts around. You probably want to change some of the facts anyway to make the story more exciting/romantic/whatever. If you want to use real names, etc, and write a fictionalized account of real events, the danger is not copyright violation -- as long as you don't copy a news story word for word -- but that people that you made up facts about could sue you for libel. Whether they really would, and whether they would win, would depend on the details of the case.