4,281 reputation
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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
age
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Aug 7 at 20:10

May
23
comment When quoting a person's informal speech, how much liberty do you have to make changes to what they say?
One of my favorite real-life misquotes: In a recent election, a candidate aired an ad that included a clip of his opponent making some statements about marriage that some people might find objectionable. But the clip was carefully framed: He cut out two words the other guy said that somewhat changed the meaning of the quote: the part where he began with "Don't say".
May
23
comment When quoting a person's informal speech, how much liberty do you have to make changes to what they say?
One very tangential comment: While it is true that an article on a web site does not have the same rigid space limitations that a print article does, that doesn't mean that it's okay to be long-winded and ramble. You don't need to respect the size of a piece of paper, but you do still need to respect the reader's time!
May
21
comment Do publishers really need to translate between UK and US English?
RE context: Yes, I tried to say something similar in my answer. A reader could be forgiven for reading that sentence and thinking that "lift" must mean escalator, or stairs, or supposing that in the UK there is some other means of travelling between floors. But unless it's important to the story exactly how the person got to the third floor, it doesn't matter. Of course, many Americans wouldn't realize that "3rd floor" here means "4th floor".
May
21
comment Do publishers really need to translate between UK and US English?
@Shantnu Good point. Logically, you would think villains would speak with French accents.
May
21
comment Do publishers really need to translate between UK and US English?
I'd think swearing and insults would be the easiest thing. If a character says, "You stupid framnar! You did it all wrong!", I think you can pretty easily guess that "framnar" is some kind of insult. As most insults pretty much mean either "stupid" or "immoral", those would be easy to guess.
May
20
answered Do publishers really need to translate between UK and US English?
May
15
comment What is the term for an accessible character that knows nothing?
I mean, I typed the text above with the numbers 1, 2, and 3, and the software automatically changed this to 1, 1, 2. I presume because the intervening paragraph made it think I was starting a new list. It's done this to me before so I'm quite sure I didn't just mis-type it. Is there a way to type in HTML directly? I don't know how to get to that mode. Would it then NOT edit my tagging?
May
13
comment What is the term for an accessible character that knows nothing?
(I typed my bullet points as 1, 2, 3, but the software on this site automatically screws up the numbering if you have multiple paragraphs within a bullet. Thanks guys.)
May
13
answered What is the term for an accessible character that knows nothing?
May
13
answered When quoting a person's informal speech, how much liberty do you have to make changes to what they say?
May
13
comment ISBN - is it possible to have one and a title before publishing?
Note Bowkers is U.S. only. If you live in some other country, they'll have their own service. I understand that in many countries you can get an ISBN for free. I haven't pursued that as I live in the U.S. and am unlikely to leave just to get cheaper ISBNs.
May
13
comment ISBN - is it possible to have one and a title before publishing?
See myidentifiers.com/isbn/main Price for 1: $125; Price for 10: $250; Price for 1000: $575; Price for 10,000: $1000. Remember that if you publish multiple editions, like a hard cover and a paperback, they each need their own ISBN. And there's no time limit on using them, so if you think you might write 3 books over the next 5 years, it makes sense to buy 10. I think for the typical self-publisher, it makes sense to buy 10 at a time. 1 is too few unless you just can't afford the extra money, but it will probably take you a long time to use 10.
May
9
awarded  Nice Question
May
9
answered Which one is correct?
May
9
comment Which one is correct?
I think it's better with "allow" than "allows". With "allow", you're implying that the "will" applies to "allow" as well as "expand". We do this all the time. "Bob will run and jump." That is, he "will run" and "will jump". It's also legal with "allows", but then you're saying it "will expand", future, but it "allows", present. In this case it works either way.
May
9
comment Is it possible my book could be taken off-line for sale if there is a cease and desist letter?
Well, this depends a lot on what country you're in, and in the U.S., on whether the other party is a "public figure". In the U.S., even if someone can prove that what you said is false, you can still win a libel suit unless they can convince the court that you lied out of "malice" or that you showed "reckless disregard for the truth". These rules were made to protect reporters who write stories that are false because the reporter simply made a mistake. My understanding is that in most other countries, it's much easier for the plaintiff to win a libel suit than it is in the U.S.
May
9
comment When self publishing, are there benefits to making a company to represent your books? Is that then a publishing house?
Sure. Go ahead. I'm happy to tell you what I've done with my company. As you're in a different country laws may be different, and the usual "I am not a lawyer" disclaimer.
May
8
comment When self publishing, are there benefits to making a company to represent your books? Is that then a publishing house?
... unless you're afraid that you're going to trying to cheat yourself, I don't see what you'd gain. Maybe there's some situation where a contract would protect you from some outside party? I'm not sure what that would be, but legal issues can certainly get complicated and weird.
May
8
comment When self publishing, are there benefits to making a company to represent your books? Is that then a publishing house?
You mean written contracts with my own company? I didn't. We just made verbal contracts. Which is probably dangerous as the owner is a very unscrupulous person. :-) As my company is a sole proprietorship, under US law it is not a separate legal entity from me, so any contract would not just "in real life" but also legally be between me and myself, and thus probably meaningless. If you made a corporation, then it's a separate legal entity, and there might be some value to having a contract. But the main purpose of a contract is to have an enforceable agreement between two parties, and ...
May
7
answered When self publishing, are there benefits to making a company to represent your books? Is that then a publishing house?