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Mar
27
comment How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
@MacCooper But if "well, that's a translation into English" is considered valid, then you could, say, call a character "John", and say, "Well, that's not necessarily an English name. It could be an English translation of Juan, or Sean, or Jean, etc."
Mar
27
comment How do you convey nonverbal utterances?
That is, don't do anything special. Just use the interjection as a word.
Mar
26
answered How to choose a good/suitable pseudonym
Mar
26
comment How to choose a good/suitable pseudonym
RE #1: Someone who generally writes children's stories, but decides to take a stab at pornography, might well want to use two different pseudonyms (or his real name and a pseudonym). Anyone who knew of the pornography would surely be hesitant to buy books for her children by this author, and people who had heard of the children's books and was looking for porn might think "what sort of sex novel would someone who wrote The Fuzzy Bear Goes to the Park write?" Yes, that's the extreme case, I can imagine wrestling with the question for less divergent genres.
Mar
25
answered How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
Mar
25
comment How to name characters of unspecific nationality and race?
Interesting thought on surnames, but I think it breaks down. Sure, there are people named O'Higgins in Chile. But they're surrounded by people named Fernandez and Rodriguez and Garcia. If EVERYONE in the story has an Irish-sounding surname, I'm not going to think, "Oh, this could be set in Chile, because there are people there with Irish surnames". Barring explicit information, I'm going to think, "This must be set in Ireland."
Mar
20
answered What are the copyright limitations for adopting a ficitonal character's name as your Pen Name?
Mar
19
comment Least distracting method of citing in a book?
(b) it's not at all clear what would constitute a convincing defense. If someone says, "I don't believe the claims about physics made in this book because the author didn't use the MLA citation style", convincing them otherwise would require a rather radical change of mindset, which would probably take a book in itself.
Mar
19
comment Least distracting method of citing in a book?
This style is unfamiliar enough that you might give a couple of sentences explaining what you are doing and why. I've done that sort of thing in a couple of my books, like including an introductory paragraph to explain why I included "real life" examples of database concepts I'm trying to explain, or why I used a certain translation of the Bible for quotes. But for something like this, I wouldn't see a need to "defend" the choice against potential criticism. If a reader discounts the information in your book because they don't like your citation style, well, (a) that's just silly, and ...
Mar
17
comment Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
@MacCooper You're perfectly free to "adapt" quotes. If you substantially change the wording, even if keeping the same idea, then all copyright issues go away. You might still be accused of plagiarism, but plagiarism isn't a crime, it's an academic violation, and if you're writing a novel and not a term paper, that's not an issue. At that point it just becomes a matter of whether you do it well or do it poorly.
Mar
17
comment Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
@MarcWolvesheir But by dropping the "become a monster himself" you've lost all that was clever about the original quote.
Mar
17
answered Attributing a real quote to a fictional character
Feb
25
awarded  fiction
Feb
24
answered Question about longer chapter length flashbacks
Feb
24
answered Referring to characters that are too familiar for a name
Feb
24
comment Does “reversing” characters provide enough of a “disconnect ”to defend against a libel suit?
@dmm But anyway, I don't think you can libel a fictional character. If I accuse Darth Vader of child abuse for torturing his daughter, he can't sue me for libel.
Feb
24
comment Does “reversing” characters provide enough of a “disconnect ”to defend against a libel suit?
@LaurenIpsum I believe in the U.S. a copyright now lasts for life of the author plus 70 years. Anonymous works are good for 95 years from date of publication. That's for things published after 1978, terms before that were much shorter.
Feb
23
answered Does “reversing” characters provide enough of a “disconnect ”to defend against a libel suit?
Feb
20
comment What are the copyright limitations for adopting a ficitonal character's name as your Pen Name?
If it's a word that existed before this writer chose to use it, as LaurenIpsum says, than it has LESS trademark protection, but not none. The words "burger" and "king" were common words before the fast food place came along, but that doesn't mean you could get away with opening your own place and calling it "Burger King". Names with made-up words, like "Linux", have a higher level of trademark protection than names using existing words, but the latter are still protected. That said, I don't know how the law would apply in your case. Which is why I'm posting this as a comment and not an answer.
Feb
16
answered How to write a conversation