Reputation
8,081
Next tag badge:
73/100 score
44/20 answers
Badges
4 19
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~266k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 232 votes cast
Feb
4
comment How many errata are too many?
@SimonWhite Did you read my last paragraph? There's nothing you can do about it, so ... where do you go from there? If the book is unreliable or unreadable, then throw it away. Otherwise, all you can do is put up with it.
Feb
3
revised Is the Concept of “Machine of Death” Copyrighted?
added 696 characters in body
Feb
3
comment Why would an agent request an exclusive submission?
Okay, I see I misunderstood your question. Still, the gist of my first paragraph still applies: The agent has to spend time deciding if he wants to represent you, and he doesn't want to spend a lot of time and then have you go elsewhere. Less of an issue though. I doubt most agents spend months deciding whether to represent a writer. Waiting six weeks to get an answer isn't really very long. I suppose if you have to go through 20 agents before you find one who will take you on, this would add up.
Feb
3
answered Why would an agent request an exclusive submission?
Feb
1
answered Is the Concept of “Machine of Death” Copyrighted?
Feb
1
comment When describing novel word counts to agents / publishers, are chapter titles and epigraphs included?
Before computers, word counts were estimated. You'd take your typed pages, count the number of letters per line, multiply by lines per page, multiply by number of pages, and divide by 6. (6 being taken as the "standard" length of an English word.) You didn't worry about blank spaces on pages or any of that. Because counting the exact number of words in a novel on typed sheets of paper would be a very long and tedious task. Today, a computer can give an exact word count in a fraction of a second. So ... I don't know whether editors today want the old-style estimate or an exact word count.
Feb
1
answered Why do news articles and press releases start with date and location?
Jan
22
answered Where do you do your writing?
Jan
22
answered Showing cultural assimilation
Jan
22
comment How many names in a book are too many?
I suspect a reader will have more difficulty keeping track of characters than a writer. To the writer, this book is his life for a period of many months, maybe years. He thinks about it constantly, writes and rewrites, etc. To the reader, it is probably a few days worth of entertainment. He is not going to devote the intellectual resources to it that the writer did. Thus, I think writers often don't realize that the number of characters is getting out of hand.
Jan
21
comment Is it plagiarism to use something from a nonfiction work and put it into fiction?
If the real issue is cultural appropriate and not plagiarism ... I was going to say you might want to edit the question, but at this point you've gotten several answers addressing plagiarism that would be rendered non-sensical. I suggest you post a new question.
Jan
21
comment Is it plagiarism to use something from a nonfiction work and put it into fiction?
"Cultural appropriation" isn't something you can get into legal trouble over. If you're a college student or professor, and your college is very PC, you might possibly get into some sort of academic trouble. That depends very much on the subjective opinions of the people in charge. If you're not a college student or professor, then it's just a matter of your own ethics. At that point it's totally debatable. I'd say that incorporating elements of a culture into a novel in a way that portrays them as positive is honoring the culture. Of course if you ridicule them, different story.
Jan
20
answered Is it plagiarism to use something from a nonfiction work and put it into fiction?
Jan
19
answered The difference between two speech formats
Jan
19
comment Can you write a pro-racism book?
There are several big right-wing publishers in the U.S., like Regnery and WND. I doubt any of them would publish a racist book, as the American right wing has opposed racism since at least Abraham Lincoln.
Jan
19
answered Is translating to other language plagiarism?
Jan
18
comment How to write negative events without laying blame in an insulting way
"400 pages of hate-mongering isn't a good story" Exactly. The people who are targets of your hate certainly aren't going to read it for pleasure. If your story is somehow established as "important" and "controversial", your targets might read it to know what the other side is saying, but few books reach that status. It might appeal to people who hate the group you are hating. Personally I can't imagine wanting to read a book that's a long diatribe against even a group I disagree with. Maybe I don't hate anyone enough.
Jan
18
answered How to write negative events without laying blame in an insulting way
Jan
18
comment How to write negative events without laying blame in an insulting way
@VilleNiemi The past was worse "in every way"? That's a very broad statement. Technology certainly makes life more comfortable for most people in Europe and North America. On the other hand, I've seen statistics claiming that more people were killed for their religion in the past 100 years than in all previous history. The two most destructive wars in history were in the past 100 years. What's your standard? I'd say it's bad that there's more promiscuity and pornography than two or three hundred years ago. Of course I could list many things that are better, I'm not saying it's all worse.
Jan
18
answered Is it fine to write something that has no relation to my local life or language or culture?