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bio website johansens.us
location Michigan
age
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen 16 hours ago

Mar
5
revised Do empty pages need a number?
added some additional thoughts
Mar
5
comment Do empty pages need a number?
It's something of a paradox, too: If they print "this page intentionally left blank" on the page, than it isn't blank, is it? It has the text "this page intentionally left blank" on it.
Feb
24
comment Blog Contributions Copyright
@unor Though re-reading your post, it sounds like this may be a fine legal distinction. Under American law, you can sell a copyright to someone else, meaning now he can use your work freely and you cannot use it without his permission. You say that under German law, you cannot sell your copyright, but you can sign a contract saying that you can't use the work any more but the other person can. What's the difference? Oh well, I suppose there could be hundreds of pages of technical distinctions in the law.
Feb
24
comment Blog Contributions Copyright
@unor Fair enough. I am speaking of American law. I don't claim to know what other country's laws say. There are international treaties about copyright that, I think, make the law very similar through most of the world. But I am not a lawyer, certainly not an international lawyer.
Feb
12
answered Should I translate foreign names of companies, organisations, political parties etc?
Feb
12
comment Using “he/she” instead of “it” for animals
We routinely refer to animals as "it". Sometimes, if a person knows the gender, they will refer to an animal as "he" or "she". A beloved pet is usually "he" or "she" to the owner. Someone knowledgeable about this species might use "he" or "she", especially if discussing mating habits, etc. Most other animals are "it". BTW I've never heard the rules LaurenIpsum mentions about cats -- not saying they're wrong, just I'd never heard them before -- so I would have referred to such cats as "it". (And by tomorrow I'll likely have forgotten which was which so I'll be back to "it".)
Feb
5
answered When should one *not* present events in chronological order?
Feb
3
comment Is there enough money in writing for me to quit my dead end job?
@dmm Oh, sorry, when I displayed the screen his post wasn't visible, I had to click "1 more comment" to see it. Yes, your comment makes perfect sense given that context. My bad.
Feb
3
answered What is the best way to use your favorite authors as inspiration without plagiarism?
Feb
3
comment Is there enough money in writing for me to quit my dead end job?
@dmm Umm, you're assuming that the OP rides to work on a bus or train for an hour each way each day. That's normal for people who live in New York, maybe some other cities. But for most of the U.S. anyway, folks drive to work, and I definitely would NOT advise trying to write a novel while driving.
Dec
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
comment Inventing names for Sci-Fi characters
My point about "inventing language structure" was just that there should be some level of consistency to avoid making it jarring. Like I said in my post, in general you don't want half the aliens to have one-syllable names and the other half to have twenty-syllable names, unless there is some reason why different groups have different kinds of names. Otherwise it's going to sound strange to the reader with no explanation. I'm not suggesting you actually invent an entire grammar and vocabulary. That seems rather unnecessary.
Dec
16
comment Inventing names for Sci-Fi characters
... the story to go into some long discussion about how to make these sounds, or to throw in combinations of letters that are unpronounceable but that are supposed to represent these alien sounds. Unless the fact that the language is unpronounceable by humans is actually a factor in the plot.
Dec
16
comment Inventing names for Sci-Fi characters
Human languages unpronounceable to each other: Sure. But I think that fits into my point. When we write, say, Arabic words in English, we often put "q" or "kh" for that sound we don't have in English, and accept that it doesn't convey the actual sound of the original. Unless your point is to learn Arabic, it's not worth the trouble to bog down the conversation with wrestling over the alphabet. That's what I'm suggesting we do for an alien language: Sure, they might have sounds not found in English, maybe even sounds that humans are incapable of making. But it's not worth bogging down ...
Nov
25
answered Variation in humor among ethnic/cultural groups
Nov
19
answered Is an MLA citation needed for a broad description of a poem's theme?
Nov
19
comment What are the 3 all-time best-sellers in each genre?
@Kit I suspect that "most total sales since they were published" and "most sales this year" could give very different answers.
Nov
5
answered Is there an accepted (or 'correct') way to write translations/subtitles for different materials (videos, articles, books, etc)?
Nov
1
comment Short story cover: “a story” or “a short story” or not putting anything at all
@LaurenIpsum Hearty agreement! I've always thought such subtitles were stating the obvious. I suppose if I wrote a novel and titled it, "Street Map of London", I might want to give it a subtitle of "A Novel" lest someone searching a catalog or Amazon thinks it's a literal street map. I recall when the movie "Superman: The Movie" came out, one film critic said, "Not to be confused with Superman: the microwave oven."
Nov
1
answered Where to put counter-examples within a 5-paragraph essay?