8,382 reputation
632
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 4 hours ago

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
30
comment Can a plagiarist sue one who plagiarized them?
@evilsoup: I believe you should recheck the difference between satire and parody. Fictional/real definitely isn't a part of the distinction. Also, Fair Use protection is uncertain/unlikely in case of using copyrighted works in satire on a subject not originally covered by these works (e.g. using copyrighted music in a clip directed at some politician). A satire on these specific works and their themes is a variant of parody, and protected. "Use (c)X to taunt Y" vs "taunt (c)Y".
Jun
30
reviewed Approve Can a plagiarist sue one who plagiarized them?
Jun
27
comment How to handle speech within speech?
If you need deeper nesting, you alternate the quotes: "outermost 'middle "innermost."'" The quintuple quote at the end may be a little confusing, but this is the correct way to do this (although not nesting this deeply is better).
Jun
27
comment Is it possible for an author's first book to be popular?
I'd say you may be sure if you got yourself a big name with 10th or so book, your first will become popular too :)
Jun
23
comment Is Jaime Lannister a “telling not showing” example?
Besides, you work with what you have. Sure showing is better than telling, but trying to shoehorn a lengthy scene that would show Jaime's swordfighting mastery only for the sake of showing it is a poorer practice than just telling he is good at it.
Jun
20
answered Switching from past to present tense to increase narrative speed?
Jun
19
comment Can a plagiarist sue one who plagiarized them?
The reason is usually fridge horror. I'm a total sucker for happy, sunny, cheerful stories with good, satisfying happy-ending. I'm a little too observant though, and at times a popularly liked story really brushes me a very wrong way, due to author's error, negligence, omission, taking a cheap shortcut, not foreseeing some consequences. This is my way of posting criticism on these, I simply take the point where the story left off and turn the horror up to eleven. Way more efficient than posting some 'what-if' comment.
Jun
19
asked Can a plagiarist sue one who plagiarized them?
Jun
18
comment In Science Fiction, how does one do research, but write at the same time?
I write when I'm in conditions to write, keyboard easily accessible etc. I research while on the bus, waiting, before sleep in bed, etc, whenever writing is not viable.
Jun
18
comment How can we have foreshadowing in a story that takes place in a universe where the future can't be known beforehand?
To make foreshadowing impossible you'd have to disable all cause-effect relations, all consistence of behaviors. To show that a dam is going to collapse you don't need a clairvoyant, you just need to observe cracks in the construction. To foreshadow a betrayal you don't need to read mind of the traitor, just drop hints about his disgruntled behavior.
Jun
17
answered Avoiding a juvenile/archaic feel in formal verse
Jun
16
comment Choosing between your Mother Tongue and other language
Regarding "change pacing and tone", I wrote a poem in English once, then translated it back to my (native) Polish. I'm still not quite sure how I ended up with one stanza more, actually a very good stanza going well with the spirit of the poem and definitely adding to it, but absolutely not present in the original.
Jun
16
answered Choosing between your Mother Tongue and other language
Jun
16
comment Writing an article avoiding Libel
...nevertheless, that doesn't prevent lawsuits. It merely prevents losing these lawsuits. You can be sued for anything, and unless the lawsuit is totally frivolous, it will take place. OTOH, truth is the best defense in libel lawsuit and since you truthfuly stated what you think, never claiming what you think is true (and safeguarding your statement with proper clauses that won't misguide the readers into believing you state actual facts) your freedom of speech (as opposed to lack of freedom in spreading misinformation) is protected.
Jun
16
comment Writing an article avoiding Libel
Primarily, if in any doubt, state clearly that you express opinions, not state facts. Your rights to express opinion are protected. Person's rights not to have slanderous falsehoods about them published are protected as well. The difference between the two are that you may presents truthful facts about given person, or truthful facts about your opinion (however wrong and misguided) about that person.
Jun
11
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
10
comment How to write a prophecy?
Note these all odd prophecies come from "plot twists" that occurred later. You have a story with improbable events, and then you wear these events into fancy wording that makes them sound impossible, or you have a story driven by (not quite defined) prophecy, and then you define the prophecy as to fulfill the story including the failures at avoiding it. This all looks cool and mystical if you look at it from the front: a story weaved around caveats of the prophecy. But it's simple really if the prophecy was made to fit the story in non-obvious manner.
Jun
10
answered How to write a prophecy?