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Nov
20
asked Exercises for improving 3rd person perspective writing
Nov
20
comment How do I avoid tech/social errors in near-future fiction?
Not only you can't - it adds to the flavor! Looking at how people 15 years ago imagined the world in 15-30 years is a fascinating, fun piece of the reading. I look at my predictions from around '2000 and laugh at how inaccurate some were, while others worked perfectly.
Nov
19
comment In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
Heh... Google StreetView is your friend!
Nov
19
comment In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
@Standback: If both merely "would work" or "be appropriate", then likely both are not enough. Don't make it a background. Make it an actor with one of lead roles. Think of the role the city is to serve, and then decide between whether "familiar" or "fresh" serves that role better. Looming stranger - "Fresh". Friend - "familiar". Traitor - "Familiar". Ruthless enemy - "Fresh". Misunderstood loner - "Fresh". Neighbor with secrets - "familiar". If it was any other genre, just background would be fine. In a thriller, it's too important to be left without a role.
Nov
19
comment Stupid Villain rather than Dark Lord
Play (or watch walkthrough of) Portal 2. Wesley is a terrible stupid villain, an idiot in charge of power beyond measure.
Nov
19
answered In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
Nov
18
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Other options for “had had”?
Nov
17
answered Best way to convey an immediate change of scenery
Nov
17
answered Can you use a company's name as title for a short story?
Nov
17
answered Should I indent when I write just a short sentence?
Nov
17
asked What does “MC” in section break mean?
Nov
15
comment How can I write a tragedy for children?
@SaintGeorg: Heh. This is what master writers do when pressed by editors/legal/etc. They write a kludge that satisfies the conditions but is outright rejected by informed audience. The child will understand the key phrases and ideas, and won't dwell on whether that's probable or not, because of the complexity. An adult will just reject it. Take a different such ending: the anime Death Note. The "Good wins" ending is in fact a depiction of "This is why Good just couldn't win." A set of circumstances so ridiculously implausible the audience will outright reject it.
Nov
15
comment How can I write a tragedy for children?
@SaintGeorg: That's how it works for adults. Children are more willing to suspend disbelief, seek comfort, and accept the extra ending. That way the goal is achieved: we have a tragedy that is just as tragic for adults (who reject the candy) as for children (for whom the harsh early ending would be too much, so the impact is softened by the unbelievable but nice second ending.)
Nov
15
answered How can I write a tragedy for children?
Nov
14
revised When it's forgivable to use “suddenly” and “all of a sudden?”
added 380 characters in body
Nov
14
comment Problem: Scenes that are unavoidable, but boring
Absolutely - I love writing diplomatic scenes in my stories. It's harder than plain old good action, but more thrilling, more challenging and more enthralling. A battle of wits, where hidden behind gentle smiles and mild frowns lethal blows are exchanged. Mild innuendos carrying lethal threats, entangling the opponent into their own lies, entrapment into a cage built of unfulfillable promises - it makes for some of the best scenes I'd ever written! (my other favorite genre is non-verbal dialogue, where two sides just exchange facial expressions and minor gestures, without ever speaking.)
Nov
13
answered Is my serial-killer novel horror or crime?
Nov
13
answered When it's forgivable to use “suddenly” and “all of a sudden?”
Nov
13
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Who can help me to describe the text line from my story in slow motion?
Nov
12
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What's a minimum recommendable word-count to generate sales in Amazon Direct Publishing (ADP)?