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May
24
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
There's a whole genre of what you're looking for: Pastorals. Perfect protagonists living happy, simple lives, romantic and idealized. Of course the genre isn't very renowned nowadays...
May
23
comment Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
A flawless protagonist would never allow these things to happen, showing enough foresight to prevent them. Lack of caution or foresight is a flaw. Extremely bad luck is a flaw too. And a happy person may lead a happy life despite their flaws, and utopia without flaws will bore to death.
May
23
answered Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
May
21
comment Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
@what: No, there's nothing about the person making some demands to the government, trying to pressure anyone, or any political agenda behind the murder. There's a world of difference between "I've killed these 20 and I'll kill more unless the government yields to my demands and changes the system" and "20 people die. System changes". Do you believe the Red Army Faction or the Red Brigades would achieve anything by silently killing random people in random places and never telling anyone, why, and what they want? Actually, I was led to believe it was a sacrifice to a demon to wish the change.
May
21
comment Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
@what: This is more of "how much paint does that guy in Arizona need to use on his fence for the lunch of President Obama to taste right". Killing random 20 people doesn't change the system of a country. It's a contrived scenario with no bearing on the reality. There is no suspension of disbelief, no plot to drive the story, just a set of random, unrelated facts that don't elicit any feelings. I just don't see why these are at odds, and more importantly, I really don't care. Maybe if you explained the connection and consequences I'd start to care and form an opinion.
May
19
answered Creating Dialogue
May
19
comment When should I use italics in scientific writing?
Generally, the right approach is to ask which Formatting and Style Guide your scientific body uses, and then follow that guide. It provides the answer in minuscule details, much finer than you'd ever find here (and probably much finer than you'd have to your liking...)
May
19
answered How to cite the C# Language Specification Version 5.0
May
16
comment Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
@what: If the readers really know as much as I about 1.the protagonist, 2.the society, 3.the 20, then they won't give a crap. For readers to care, you must attach them to the world and the characters, make the world immersive, and the only way to do that is by presenting that in detail. Without that, the story has no depth, and without depth there is no suspension of disbelief, and no expectations. "Meh, whatever."
May
16
comment Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
@what: The question doesn't detail how much is known about the 20 in the story, or what kind of group the 20 comprise.
May
16
comment Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
@what: That depends on a lot of factors. How likable are the 20? How likable is the society? Are the 20 the ones guilty of the current situation, or just necessary sacrifices? Will they be simply slaughtered or hunted down while fighting back? What kind of person is the protagonist? Far too many unknowns to make a meaningful decision basing on available data.
May
16
answered Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
May
15
comment Genre conventions: Which end do readers expect?
We should know more about the protagonist and the 20. If they are government types, the 'kill them' ending would be very satisfying.
May
15
comment Storyboard a Novel?
Well, I did, simply because the answer is off-topic. The question is about basing a book on a script, while you answer is about basing a movie on the book; a completely reversed relation.
May
15
comment How to distill a plot into a logline?
(2) that's I no longer watch Hollywood movies. You've seen a hundred, you've seen them all. (3) I agree - one of these rules that exist only to be broken. This I can accept.
May
15
comment How to distill a plot into a logline?
Personally, such rigid step-by-step recipes for ANY creative work (even 25 words long) really stroke me the wrong way. This is trying to squeeze every single written work into a narrow frame. I wonder how your logline would treat, say, Game of Thrones without making it shallow.
May
15
comment Is it OK to have two different POVs in a same paragraph (third-person omniscient narrator)?
Acceptable - yes, this is what Omniscient means after all. But usually it's cheesy, the easy way out. OTOH, you can always reflect this through knowledge of the other character: Kuo reflecting on likes/dislikes of Mei-Ling.
May
15
comment Is there such a thing as a “reverse analogy”?
@justhalf: 1. Lauren is a female name, 2. look at our rep. We've spent a lot of time here on Writers.se, so we got to know each other a little.
May
15
answered Is there such a thing as a “reverse analogy”?
May
15
comment Is there such a thing as a “reverse analogy”?
@justhalf: Analogy: comparing relations: A is related to B is like C is related to D. Simile: comparing items: A is like B. Metaphor: A [used instead of B, which is similar to A] (actually Lauren might have confused you a bit here because she wrote it in form of a simile, but if I wrote "AIDS attacks your body's army", then "your body's army" is the metaphor meaning white blood cells).