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Nov
24
answered What does/would it mean to code a novel?
Nov
24
comment Editors: Edit on first read, or read and edit on second round?
There's a specific point to your fellow editor's method: If you don't remember about given point/worry at the end of reading, was it important enough to worry about, to begin with? Letting your memory be the filter of "important/unimportant" is a good method to get rid of many unnecessary worries. "I would have remembered it if it was worth remembering."
Nov
22
answered When do I explain my created world scenario in a prologue vs. letting it unfold in the story?
Nov
21
answered Should I switch to present tense when the narrator is talking about one of his habits?
Nov
20
comment Can we enable readers to connect to far future humanity, without pretending they wouldn’t be different?
I want to suggest "Transmetropolitan", a cyberpunk comic book series written by Warren Ellis. It's sci-fi which strikes a shocking middle with constant struggle with things that humanity struggled with for past millennium or two, and driving growth of ires of our day into parodistic proportions (...30 cameras per cubic meter of city space on the average? Commercials in dreams?) - and simultaneously isn't as negative as one might think - there are still significant upsides of the new world! The connection with the "now" is solid and amazing.
Nov
20
comment In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
@Standback Well, decide what role the city plays in your story. If you still have problems determining which of the two approaches is better, post that role and then we can discuss.
Nov
20
asked Exercises for improving 3rd person perspective writing
Nov
20
comment How do I avoid tech/social errors in near-future fiction?
Not only you can't - it adds to the flavor! Looking at how people 15 years ago imagined the world in 15-30 years is a fascinating, fun piece of the reading. I look at my predictions from around '2000 and laugh at how inaccurate some were, while others worked perfectly.
Nov
19
comment In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
Heh... Google StreetView is your friend!
Nov
19
comment In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
@Standback: If both merely "would work" or "be appropriate", then likely both are not enough. Don't make it a background. Make it an actor with one of lead roles. Think of the role the city is to serve, and then decide between whether "familiar" or "fresh" serves that role better. Looming stranger - "Fresh". Friend - "familiar". Traitor - "Familiar". Ruthless enemy - "Fresh". Misunderstood loner - "Fresh". Neighbor with secrets - "familiar". If it was any other genre, just background would be fine. In a thriller, it's too important to be left without a role.
Nov
19
comment Stupid Villain rather than Dark Lord
Play (or watch walkthrough of) Portal 2. Wesley is a terrible stupid villain, an idiot in charge of power beyond measure.
Nov
19
answered In a thriller, should my famous cities be familiar, or fresh?
Nov
18
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Other options for “had had”?
Nov
17
answered Best way to convey an immediate change of scenery
Nov
17
answered Can you use a company's name as title for a short story?
Nov
17
answered Should I indent when I write just a short sentence?
Nov
17
asked What does “MC” in section break mean?
Nov
15
comment How can I write a tragedy for children?
@SaintGeorg: Heh. This is what master writers do when pressed by editors/legal/etc. They write a kludge that satisfies the conditions but is outright rejected by informed audience. The child will understand the key phrases and ideas, and won't dwell on whether that's probable or not, because of the complexity. An adult will just reject it. Take a different such ending: the anime Death Note. The "Good wins" ending is in fact a depiction of "This is why Good just couldn't win." A set of circumstances so ridiculously implausible the audience will outright reject it.
Nov
15
comment How can I write a tragedy for children?
@SaintGeorg: That's how it works for adults. Children are more willing to suspend disbelief, seek comfort, and accept the extra ending. That way the goal is achieved: we have a tragedy that is just as tragic for adults (who reject the candy) as for children (for whom the harsh early ending would be too much, so the impact is softened by the unbelievable but nice second ending.)
Nov
15
answered How can I write a tragedy for children?