667 reputation
17
bio website
location
age 35
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Feb 3 at 2:05

Jun
27
comment Style Critique (1200 words)
And please, please, break up the dialogue in the part right after the last poem with line breaks, it's so confusing having it all in one big chunk of text.
Jun
27
comment Style Critique (1200 words)
You need to fix the editing of the part that starts with "With the kettle now boiling on the fire...". I'd do it, but there's a silly SE rule that you can't edit less than 6 characters.
Jun
27
comment About the Author description
You might also consider the way you list your qualifications. If you say it in the tone of "I'm qualified, so I know what I'm talking about" you might come of as condescending or that you're simply bragging. If it's more of an "Oh, and by the way, these are my qualifications", the reader will come to the conclusion "oh, so that's why he sounds like he knows what he's talking about" on his own, and like you better because of it.
Jun
27
comment What's a good market for experimental novellas?
That's what the critique sites are for. Better than most editors, IMHO. Different media, different tools.
Jun
27
comment Intervening Characters in fiction
@LaurenIpsum Oh, sorry, a character who intervenes, I see now. I figured it was "inventing characters in fiction" - which is, in the end, what people do in fiction ;) My bad.
Jun
27
comment Intervening Characters in fiction
@LaurenIpsum How do you intervene a character? Intervene against what?
Jun
26
comment Intervening Characters in fiction
Sorry, "intervening"? Is that a typo?
Jun
26
answered Is this stylized writing successful or gimmicky?
Jun
26
answered Intervening Characters in fiction
Jun
24
comment Why can't I write something longer than a few pages?
+1 for "Writers block seems to happen when something is wrong with your story." In my example, it was that my story felt fake to me. Another small advice to avoid writer's block: if you know the next scene you're going to write, leave some of it for tomorrow. It will make it easier for you to start writing the next day, you won't have to stare at it and wonder what to write. By the time you write the leftovers from yesterday, odds are you'll figure out the next scene.
Jun
24
comment think, I think, I don't think
It's like saying run-on sentences are bad and should never be used. They are bad most of the time, true, but they have their use, if you know how to use them right. Writers are limited to language, they don't have picture, sound, smell... They should make use of the language to the fullest, not limit themselves additionally. Everything, dashes, ellipses, sentence structure, sentence length, repetition, everything can be used to give subtle nuances to what you're saying. Declaring anything in language as bad is, well, bad.
Jun
24
comment think, I think, I don't think
Not necessarily. Beginner writers can eat up everything you say. If you tell them, you must use proper grammar and spelling, that's great. But if you tell them "You must use short sentences" there's a good chance they'll accept it as fact, and it will prevent them from developing their own style, because they'll be developing your style instead. All I'm saying, "I think" has it's proper use and shouldn't be dismissed just because it makes you look weak. In corporate setting you don't want to guide anyone, you want to convince them to see things your way, which you can't do if you look weak.
Jun
24
comment Fixing fundamental flaws of structure and composition under deadline
Technically, this is not a question about writing, it's more of a philosophical debate ;) In the end, you're the one who needs to make a decision. What can you live with? Can you live with turning in a flawed work? Can you live with failing to turn in the work on time? Which of these two scares/irritates/angers/damages/whatever you more?
Jun
24
comment What is first electronic rights?
But not forums or communities. Some forums do have a private section available to only registered users for this very thing. On the site where I like to post my work you have an option to hide your work from search engines and unregistered users, but it's a huge site. If a possible publisher finds out I have an account there, all he needs to do is make an account and visit my page and I'm busted. Sure, I can delete it after I get my critiques, but nothing is ever truly deleted from the net. I don't want to spend my life worrying some publisher will discover that my story wasn't a "virgin".
Jun
24
comment think, I think, I don't think
And if you ask ten different writers for a critique, you'll get ten different advices. The fact that you present your opinions as fact does not make your opinion any truer than the opinions of the other nine writers. Now, if you're a publisher and say "You must change this if you want me to publish you" that's a fact. But if you say "You must add more description" someone else will say "You must use less description" - neither of those are facts, those are nothing but personal preferences. Which you are presenting as facts.
Jun
24
comment What is first electronic rights?
This makes life harder for all of us that use writing sites to workshop stories and get critiques. You get a nice, polished story from all the quality input you get from other writers and readers, and then you can't do anything with it, you can't send it to contests for example, because they all ask for first publication rights. It sucks.
Jun
24
comment think, I think, I don't think
Not always. In some cases it can come off as extremely rude. If you're critiquing someone's writing, for example (and anyone that's done any critiquing knows how easy it is to offend a writer, even if you mean well), telling him "You should change that" is condescending. If it's a spelling error, a fact, then it's ok, but if it's a question of style, like using this word or that, short or long sentence, something subjective, an opinion, then "I think you should change that" or "You might consider changing that," will get you much further than ordering a writer what to do with his own writing.
Jun
23
comment Is the following sentence structure allowed in fiction?
Sometimes, to make a point, yes, redundancy is ok. But here, I feel it just breaks the flow. Just saying their names has more impact. If it was something like 'She thought about all the things she never got to tell them', that would be acceptable (maybe because 'All the things she never got to tell them.' doesn't really stand well on it's own ;) )
Jun
23
comment Is the following sentence structure allowed in fiction?
"She thought about" is redundant and should be avoided.
Jun
23
comment Is the following sentence structure allowed in fiction?
There was also a "she'll would" but you fixed it already :D