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 Scholar
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Jun
30
awarded  Scholar
Jun
30
accepted The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
Jun
30
comment The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
Thanks to everyone for their input. I can only accept one answer, but I've upvoted each answer that I found beneficial.
Jun
25
comment The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
I have updated the sentence in question to If, on the other hand, you're the type of person who eats one large order of fries every day, and an icing-covered cupcake at the convenience store for a snack (for a combined 7 grams of daily trans fat), you're likely to lose more than half a letter grade, and walk away with only a C+--a score just below 80%! Does that feel more honest to you?
Jun
25
comment The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
Thank you for your comments. My intention wasn't to deceive, but to bring the numbers into perspective. "1 gram of daily tf intake = 0.76 lower score on the memory test" is pretty abstract for people to understand. My goal was to make those numbers more concrete, by showing an actual amount of junk food, and an actual test score. Perhaps there are more "honest" ways to do that, than by providing my example, with a disclaimer. But that's probably for another question.
Jun
25
awarded  Excavator
Jun
25
revised Do Writers Use LaTex/TeX for writing?
formatting improvement
Jun
25
awarded  Student
Jun
24
suggested approved edit on Do Writers Use LaTex/TeX for writing?
Jun
24
comment Should you use two spaces after a period, or just a single one?
A minor historical nitpick/omission: Moveable type standards in America, France, and a few other places, called for em-spacing between sentences. When manual typewriters were existed, there was only a single space, so a double space was used to emulate em-spacing. (read more)
Jun
24
comment The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
I have moved the "fine print" into the body. Specifically, the 2nd to last paragraph under "How the study was done" and the last paragraph under "Half a letter grade." I've reduced the "correlation does not mean causation" principle to an implication, rather than stating it explicitly. I hope that's enough to ward off any nit-pickers. Revised version
Jun
24
awarded  Editor
Jun
24
revised The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
added 116 characters in body
Jun
24
comment The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
Thanks for the advice. I'm working now to move most of the fine print into the body of the text. I'm still concerned, though, that the "Correlation does not mean causation" phrase itself is over the heads of many scientifically uninitiated people. Fully explaining that concept to someone who's uninitiated can be daunting, in my experience.
Jun
24
asked The fine line between accurate science, and confusing my reader
May
12
awarded  Supporter
May
12
awarded  Autobiographer