485 reputation
210
bio website nickbedford.com
location Brisbane, Australia
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 11 hours ago

Photographer, musician and programmer.


Oct
17
answered Writing is it the plot, subplot or backstory
Oct
16
comment Are the following passages examples of tense change? Are they allowed in fiction writing?
@Philipp agreed. I would emphasise it by rewording it. "Plus**,** it had everything we needed**;** a basic table, a bathroom, but to my dismay, only one bed." Express emotions through words, not type effects.
Oct
16
revised Improving the flow/rhythm of the following comparison
added 255 characters in body
Oct
15
answered Improving the flow/rhythm of the following comparison
Oct
15
comment Improving the flow/rhythm of the following comparison
Just a side note, I would change the 2nd/3rd sentence to be: "I was beginning to like her more. I also realized we had some things in common, like our attempts of suicide." "Like" should be part of the previous sentence.
Oct
15
answered Epic -Fantasy/Medieval Story/Novel- (Need advice for text/rhetorical usage)
Oct
15
revised Need A Way To Avoid Excessive Use Of Subject When Refering To Character
Highlighted pronouns.
Oct
14
comment How does the 10,000 hour rule apply to writing?
The key to mastering anything is knowing how to improve, learning from mistakes and seeking out knowledge from those people who are great at what they do. Putting in time is only part of the equation.
Oct
14
answered Need A Way To Avoid Excessive Use Of Subject When Refering To Character
Oct
12
comment How do you effectively develop a plot, when you have a proper back story?
While a science fiction story wouldn't be complete without world/history building aspects, rooting those parts in the perspective of the protagonist and other characters will help to make it believable. If you think about it, your character is probably not going to notice things the same way we would if we were thrown into a futuristic city or landing on a desert planet. Star Wars is an obvious example, and Serenity/Firefly did arguably as well in this respect, if not more due to its Earth based history. I find these are the most relatable and successful depictions of science fiction stories.
Dec
14
awarded  Yearling
May
8
comment Potential confusion: referring to home planet as “Earth”
Thanks for the extra cent :)
Dec
14
awarded  Yearling
Sep
2
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
10
awarded  Nice Answer
May
24
revised Vision/dream as an effective opening?
edited tags
May
21
accepted Vision/dream as an effective opening?
May
20
comment Vision/dream as an effective opening?
Thanks. I can see why it doesn't work well, despite the roughness of my post's version. I think if I'm going to do this vision (given to him by this alien), it has to be connected to what he's doing. Perhaps it's a few pages in that it actually happens, and as a result he ends up in a hospital for apparently passing out, or something.
May
20
comment Vision/dream as an effective opening?
The passage was rushed and a little unthought out, I'll admit. I agree, it needs context, and it also needs a lot of work in itself. Perhaps he's "on the job" (whatever that may be) and the vision happens, interrupting him that has repercussions, only for it to happen again later.
May
20
comment Vision/dream as an effective opening?
Admittedly it was a rushed attempt, but I see your point about putting the vision in context, not to mention some inconsistent elements.