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 Taxonomist
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Mar
30
comment What is a normal length for a chapter?
I've found that my chapters tend to average about 4,000 as well. It kinda just feels right. Ends up being about 10-15 pages each.
Mar
27
awarded  Taxonomist
Jan
3
comment “All of a sudden…” ?
And another example, Just as he was beginning to doze off, the building shook. George grabbed the arms of his chair and hit his knee on the desk.
Jan
3
comment “All of a sudden…” ?
Great answer. I've found that's there's almost always a way out of using "suddenly". For example, It was then that Skye noticed something in her peripheral vision. She grabbed her pistol and jumped to her feet, aiming towards a man dressed in a form fitting suede jacket ...
Jan
3
answered How can I tell if a novel idea is made for a series or a stand-alone?
Jan
3
answered Signs of Bad Character Development
Jan
3
comment Signs of Bad Character Development
Revealing their character fist through actions and dialogue then later with little expository paragraphs (but without breaking flow) is the most natural way of building up a character's story in my opinion.
Dec
31
revised Repeating a subject
Changed example to a quote.
Dec
31
answered Repeating a subject
Dec
31
suggested approved edit on Repeating a subject
Dec
30
comment How to deal with common Earth references in a non-Earth setting?
Agreed. Some of the best science fiction stories I've read don't bother trying to make up and explain everything, but rather get on with the plot, the emotion and the character's actions, allowing the reader to easily be absorbed. It's when you are given those little tidbits such as names and descriptions of non-Earth related "things" that you get the fantastical feeling that enriches the human aspect of the experience.
Dec
30
comment How to deal with common Earth references in a non-Earth setting?
This is the stance I am taking. The race are humans, very relatable humans, so I'm personally walking a fine line between generally relatable references like "green", "birds" and "leather" and trying to avoid more specific Earth bound references like "cheetah", "budgerigar" and "cotton". It's a tricky line to walk.
Dec
30
comment How to deal with common Earth references in a non-Earth setting?
This is something I'm occasionally running into as well. While mine are human, I'm more running into the problem of relating experiences to specific Earth bound names such as "cotton" or "bats". More general names like "leather" and "birds" seem more okay to use, though.
Dec
30
revised Forming The Perfect Inspirational Character
Rewrote for clarity (assuming not native English?)
Dec
30
suggested approved edit on Forming The Perfect Inspirational Character
Dec
29
revised What aspects of written dialogue are important when giving characters a unique voice?
added 44 characters in body
Dec
29
answered What aspects of written dialogue are important when giving characters a unique voice?
Dec
29
comment What aspects of written dialogue are important when giving characters a unique voice?
What do you mean by "mails"?
Dec
29
comment How do I work through writer's block?
I'm trying to take a plotter's approach to discovery writing by at least writing down vague ideas about major plot points and scenes that may happen. It seems like it's helping me become more familiar with the story I'm trying to "discover".
Dec
29
comment How do I work through writer's block?
I've been sitting on 2 chapters and a major, but vaguely defined story arc for about 6 years. I'm only just starting to pick it up again so I feel your pain! I find watching relatable movies and reading novels gives me motivation and simple ideas on which to feed off without copying directly, however.