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seen Jan 26 at 10:54

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Jan
8
comment How about a story as a series of anecdotes?
It seems like a lot of books follow this format. (The Five People You Meet in Heaven was the first that popped into my mind.)
Dec
28
comment alternatives to “he said” in dialog
Good general answer, although I don't think opined is particularly good in that example. Perhaps "I've found an important clue!" Bob exclaimed, or, "On the contrary, I think this clue is very important," Bob opined. (But that might just be the way I'm imagining it without additional context.)
Dec
28
revised Is it okay to call the reader's target audience stupid?
removed erroneous apostrophe
Dec
25
revised Effective ways to enrich your active vocabulary?
added missing preposition
Dec
1
revised Is it good style in fiction to write sentences as a flow of (disjointed) thoughts?
"code text" with scroll bar to quote box - then "a" to "another" just to get the edit to 6 non-space characters
Dec
1
suggested approved edit on Is it good style in fiction to write sentences as a flow of (disjointed) thoughts?
Nov
26
answered Effective ways to enrich your active vocabulary?
Nov
26
comment How many errors should I expect from a proofreader?
No way to tell from the information given. You should at least reveal how many errors the proofreader found. If she missed ten but found a thousand, I'd say that's pretty good work. If she missed ten and only found twenty, I'd find that rather slipshod.
Nov
22
answered Headline method - How do I write The Economist-style headlines?
Nov
22
comment Headline method - How do I write The Economist-style headlines?
After doing the search you recommended, I find myself wondering: do you mean headlines, or tag lines?
Nov
21
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Nov
12
answered Is the opening of this detective short story gripping enough to read on? Can it be shortened?
Nov
9
comment Does this opening paragraph grab your attention? (very normal setting)
The new version seems much improved. I'd change "he didn't know what he was supposed to buy" to "he couldn't remember what he was supposed to buy." The sentence before that should be trimmed, too: "That's why he was standing in the busy convenience store." (No need to say the verbose "That had been the reason he had gone out, and entered" – that's all implied by the fact that he's standing there). One more suggestion: I'd change the first preposition from "at" to "inside". Otherwise, the wording can create the impression that Jun is outside, on the sidewalk next to the parking lot.
Nov
8
comment Does this opening paragraph grab your attention? (very normal setting)
alex: I wondered about that when I made that comment – maybe that's different in different country. I appreciate learning that. Still, it might be worth noting that an American reader, at least, would find that very strange indeed.
Nov
8
revised Does this opening paragraph grab your attention? (very normal setting)
added 244 characters in body
Nov
8
comment Does this opening paragraph grab your attention? (very normal setting)
That revelation might change the situation some, but the narrative still plods along. For example, don't say that he decided to sit on the stool, just have him sit on the stool. Also, "He scratched his ear and lifted his head" is your third sentence. How is that supposed to grab a reader's attention? It makes me feel like I'm in a long line at the bank – not getting strapped into a roller coaster for an exciting ride. Instead of focusing on his insignificant tics or who is in the store, try describing his panicked mind.
Nov
8
comment Does a Haiku needs to have exactly 17 syllables?
This is contradicted by the Wikipedia article about haiku. However, many people are taught the 5-7-5 syllable pattern for haiku, and it's become a commonly-held misconception. So, although I'd disagree with this answer in a technical sense, I think it reflects a widespread belief nonetheless.
Nov
8
answered Does this opening paragraph grab your attention? (very normal setting)
Oct
26
awarded  Critic
Oct
3
awarded  Editor