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"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so." (Sherlock Holmes)

I sometimes enjoy embedding puns and subtle self-references into many of my answers and comments.

Remember, context is everything.


Never make the mistake of thinking that a tiny preposition has only one meaning.


Aug
26
comment Best way to become more natural at English
john, you can ask specific questions about articles and such as they arise, but asking "How can I best master English?" is indeed too broad. ELL has a meta thread with some helpful resources, but there is no one "best way" to improve fluency. (As for "any mistakes" in your post, you need to be careful about capitalization – it's English, not "english" and Ayn Rand, not "Ayn rand" – and punctuation – don't use paragraph breaks before you've terminated the previous sentence with proper punctuation.)
Feb
23
comment Attributing Quote to Fictional Characters (Who are based on real people)
I believe it was Twain who said that, not Franklin :^)
Feb
23
comment Struggling to writing in English
Insofar as resources go, there's the English Language Learners Stack Exchange site. They don't do proofreading there, but they might be able to help with any specific questions you have about English.
Feb
23
answered Struggling to writing in English
Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Feb
2
comment Multiple characters without names: how to address
Sometimes I don't ever plan to give someone a name. Particularly if they are going to be disposed of in some fashion not warranting the effort of naming them. Oh, yes, I've seen him! The guy in the red shirt.
Feb
2
comment What is the best way to use your favorite authors as inspiration without plagiarism?
@LaurenIpsum - You can probably back it up further than that. That object could be Excalibur for all we know. :^)
Jan
27
comment Writing a short documentary about a medical clinic
@SF - Perhaps so. This is how I was envisioning it, though: Let's say that during your research, you learn that the clinic gets very busy on Saturday nights, often with very bad injuries (car wrecks, gunshot wounds, etc.). The narrator might read one or two lines from a script (The clinic gets very busy on Saturday nights, often with patients who are badly injured) and then the documentary would show some of the more bloody patients being wheeled into triage. In this case, the script came from the research findings; beforehand, the writer may not have known about Saturday the night spikes.
Jan
27
answered Writing a short documentary about a medical clinic
Jan
11
revised Dates and numbers in newspaper articles
except in billiards, "English" is spelled with a capital E
Jan
11
suggested suggested edit on Dates and numbers in newspaper articles
Jan
11
comment Dates and numbers in newspaper articles
If you looked around and found inconsistent examples, then it stands to reason that there is no "universal format." However, I doubt it's left up to the "author's discretion" – many publications probably have their own formatting standards.
Jan
11
answered Seeking information regarding the use of a period between the day, month, and year formatting
Jan
11
answered Can the term “Glorified delivery” be used to signify giving birth?
Nov
16
comment How can I write a tragedy for children?
@LaurenIpsum - Charlotte's Web, too. Oh, that was rough when Charlotte died...
Nov
15
comment How can I write a tragedy for children?
Yes. Who saw "Old Yeller?" Who cried when Old Yeller got shot at the end? (John Winger, played by Bill Murray, in Stripes).
Nov
15
answered How can I write a tragedy for children?
Jul
3
revised story driven by event rhythm
fixed capitalization in opening sentence; added italics to story title. Also, I don't think this is Episode V, but it's Episode IV
Jul
3
suggested suggested edit on story driven by event rhythm
Jul
2
comment Does the country matter in a story if it is set in a real one?
I'm in agreement with most everything here, except I think murder mysteries often do benefit when the author is familiar with local law enforcement, and it would be hard to write a credible mystery without that familiarity. Hence, American murder mysteries feature detectives who recite Miranda rights (when they finally catch the murderer), British mysteries have references to Scotland Yard, and so forth. "Book 'em, Dano."