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seen Feb 19 '13 at 22:00

Apr
24
revised “Lacking meat”, “Content-free”, and poor defense-development. Please critique my work
added 27 characters in body
Apr
24
comment “Lacking meat”, “Content-free”, and poor defense-development. Please critique my work
Also it's worth mentioning I do like your "voice" in your writing. Take care, as you go through this process of editing, that you preserve and foster that voice. A great voice can cover many writing sins, and more importantly, is what draws people to your work. So don't kill it.
Apr
24
comment “Lacking meat”, “Content-free”, and poor defense-development. Please critique my work
For what it's worth, the article did make more sense to me the more I (re)read it, and oddly, I liked it better on your blog. Something about the formatting/fonts/background made it easier to read, I think. Point is, this critique is based on my impressions from the first pass. With your most readers, you only get that one shot.
Apr
24
comment “Lacking meat”, “Content-free”, and poor defense-development. Please critique my work
Incidentally, you can't skip past the ads on hulu.
Apr
24
answered “Lacking meat”, “Content-free”, and poor defense-development. Please critique my work
Apr
16
comment Is it a bad idea to have all the action in the beginning and all the dialogue in the end?
@alexchenco "... story is really about the in existence of the soul." Gee, ya think? You fairly well bludgeon people about the head with it. This is an underlying problem with the story - you have a message, and the story is sacrificed to it. This is a common problem in religious fiction like this. When an author comes into the story with a preexisting conclusion, and the reason for the story is spreading that conclusion, what's often not understood (by the author) is that a conclusion is an end -- and what's missing from the story is the journey to that end.
Apr
16
comment Tips for describing features of unusual place that I often visit
@KoenVanDamme +1 for using other senses. Frequently, if you analyse a descriptive scene that sticks in your head, you'll find senses besides sight used. For me, smell seems to be a sense that really makes a scene stand out.
Apr
15
answered Tips for describing features of unusual place that I often visit
Apr
11
comment A rhyming dictionary worth bookmarking online or purchasing?
the kind where it's pronounced "what what", lol.
Apr
11
answered How do you find your unique style?
Apr
11
comment How can I catch more errors when I proofread?
Especially good if you put it down for a while, a couple weeks perhaps, then pick it up and read it to someone. That gives your brain time to clear out the auto-insert cache so you stumble over a missing word rather than speaking it anyway.
Apr
5
comment What should be put on scene notecards? (for novel writing)
+1 for "note my goals...". That plays well with the direction nathan lawrence's answer just sent my mind in.
Apr
5
comment What should be put on scene notecards? (for novel writing)
I'm really intrigued by your #3, "Why they're there" and #4, "How this affects the characters and the story" (and @Aerovistae 's excellent expansion on it). I'd usually have #1 & #3, but really, that's just factual information I already know... making myself explain why the scene's there and how it plays in the story arc may be just what I was missing. I think I'll go do some navel gazing on it and try couple of test cards on my current story.
Apr
5
comment What should be put on scene notecards? (for novel writing)
@NeilFein no, not offhand. This was several years ago, so they're buried somewhere in a box or something. I'll have a look, but I don't know if I'll find them. Basically though, what I'm looking for is toward the Best Practices end of things for the next novel, not trying to salvage that one (it needs a total, ground up rewrite to even think of being good :-) )
Apr
3
awarded  Student
Apr
3
asked What should be put on scene notecards? (for novel writing)
Apr
3
comment Floating vs Float
@Noah on 'for fishing'/'to fish'. Lauren Ipsum has it right -- I knew immediately when I read "for fishing" that you're not american. Think of "for" and "to" in this context by thinking of the question it answers. "for" answers the question "used for what?", and "to" answers the question "in order to do what?". So, "They went outside to fish" answers the question "They went outside in order to do what?", but not "They went outside which is used for what?" <- (notice it doesn't make sense as a question; that's how you know it's the other one).
Apr
3
comment Floating vs Float
@Noah yep, your new edited version looks good to me, except for one thing -- "...a big fish swam..." needs either "up", "by", or "in" after it. I prefer "a big fish swam by", but any one of those works. The "feeling" of what happens with the fish changes a little between those three: "swam by" has the fish enter and leave the scene; "swam in" has the fish enter the scene, and stay - with more fishy action to follow; and "swam up" is like "swam in" except a little more surprise and a little more wallet focused.
Mar
30
comment Color Scheme for Print and eBook
Also, as a heads up: if you decide to put it out on Amazon's kindle as well, you'll need another version for that. I helped one fellow I know e-publish his novel. I had to branched his source doc into 2 versions -- one for amazon, the other for smashwords (epub). The big differences are in how they handle the table of contents, and how the chapter breaks are indicated.
Mar
30
comment Color Scheme for Print and eBook
Multiple versions for different publishing mediums is definitely the way to go. I kind of assumed you were, and that you were just trying get them to look the same, for exactly the reason you point out here -- epub flows, paper don't. Your decision to make the book look differently as well depending on medium is a wise one. After all, you want to play to each medium's strengths.