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This 'about me' will probably be updated when I have the time to edit every site-profile manually, and when I can be more active on the network.

Till then, this remains a placeholder account with all of my previous questions, comments, and whatever else is tied to my alias on SE.

sig: ???


Jan
3
comment Researching sensitive subjects
So, to see where I can 'help' you, which of the following are you asking: 1. How do I go about researching generally sensitive subjects? Since there are a number of subjects that are seemingly universally 'sensitive'. I can't help you with that.
Jan
3
comment Researching sensitive subjects
I think the question is more general than this specific example which the OP seemed to include merely as an, well, example. IOW: "Researching sensitive subject*s*".
Dec
25
awarded  Fanatic
Dec
22
revised How to refer to character of focus in a story
Compact; clear; grammar-corrected
Dec
21
comment A cross-[What] kind of romance?
@LaurenI, If it keeps eluding you, you can always fall back to "cross-definition romance"! However you define your being as, well, being, then my being can love them from across definitions! To find a term for that you'll have to define what they have in common and make that a superset of what they are. If both are AIs (or anything similar) then it can be "cross-chip", where "sentience" could be its superset, like "species" is to "breed".
Dec
21
comment A cross-[What] kind of romance?
"Cross-capable"? That would cover almost all cases, since one only needs two "capable" individuals/entities and if those two can make it work then the romance was "cross-capable". You might want another capable that's close to, but is not, 'capable', though, but I can't help with that.
Dec
18
comment Finding before/after examples where writing has been improved, to learn from
"The second paragraph", oh my!
Dec
18
comment Looking for a verb that means “making something looks very simple by ignoring its complexity or details”
There's also a 'joke verb' that's been circulating in my study group lately that might work if you know the reader would get it and if the writing is on the far right end of the formal/informal scale of language. The word is: "fermicalc" and I'll leave it to you to figure out how it came about.
Dec
15
comment Is it a bad writing practice to start sentences with a verb?
@LaurenI, Well, if you did 'eventually' understand me then there's something very wrong in what I said, or at least horribly unclear. Should I delete my comments just in case?
Dec
15
comment Looking for a verb that means “making something looks very simple by ignoring its complexity or details”
How about 'dilute' or 'abridge'? Neither mean what you're asking for literally but I imagine one could use either by some creative license but it depends on your field.
Dec
15
comment Is it a bad writing practice to start sentences with a verb?
@LaurenI, I assumed I'd clarified this by correcting 'sentences' to 'phrases' earlier but no. What would you call a strictly SVO construct? All English [something] are SVO modified by adjuncts/conjunctions/... which as a whole make a sentence but I'm short on vocab here.
Dec
14
comment Is it a bad writing practice to start sentences with a verb?
@LaurenI, No. Smith's examples are correct but his sentences are what varied not the phrases. This's a hopeful rephrasing: what I meant to say is that English is always SVO (unlike, eg., Arabic, which supports SVO and VSO among others) and that what alex meant is structural variety which has nothing to do with proper verbs. The verbs should be near the topic of the sentence in the middle/end (even if one could do otherwise grammatically) and that focusing on using their other forms to achieve variety is undesirable as it might get formulaic. I hope I've cleared that up...
Dec
14
comment Is it a bad writing practice to start sentences with a verb?
@LaurenI, Which? Although now I think I should have said "English phrases can only ever start with nouns or a suitable substitute." which might not change anything so which part do you disagree with?
Dec
14
comment Is it a bad writing practice to start sentences with a verb?
English sentences can only ever start with nouns or a suitable substitute. Exceptions include phrases in the imperative and certain idioms and expressions. Pronouns can, and often should, be substituted for nouns in fiction as always referring to an object by its proper name/noun gets troublesome quickly; ask the guys behind Lojban. So you can't have a problem with 'over-using' pronouns. The structure might need some work and variation, but I can't help with that. What you call 'verbs' (talking-hearing-...) are gerunds or present participles, somewhat more 'nouns' than 'verbs'.
Dec
14
comment Are music lyrics copyrighted?
By "referencing the song/someone's work in yours", do you mean quoting it, using it in the plot somehow, or simply naming it? Would I need permission to write that a character was listening to [singer-here]'s song named [song-name]?
Dec
9
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
29
awarded  Yearling
Nov
23
comment Effective ways to enrich your active vocabulary?
I'll second Vocabulary.com. Although I first recommended it on another question that asked how to 'expand vocabulary' not '-active vocabulary'. But I found myself using the new words I learned there, even though they should be 7th grade-lvl in an English-speaking country. Because it shows the word in context, I get a 'feel' not a definition of it, and because it asks me to use it in an appropriate context -without my knowing that it is the needed word- means that I use it, understanding when I should use, without thinking that I should; it just fits in.
Nov
19
comment How does one write a character smarter than oneself?
@LaurenI, References, please?
Nov
19
comment Striking the balance between dialogue and narrative
You, YOU! ;) Still, non of the answers offers the golden rule, sadly, of whose existence I'm at best skeptical. Highly praised works, I noticed, tend to focus more on narration (implying more complex stories) while those from 'more-amateur' writers focus on dialog (implying weak story-craft). But that's according to critics; no doubt I enjoyed The Lake of the Long Sun; I, Robot; LOTR and the like, but I liked the HP books more, merely because I could remember how the characters 'felt' to me, not only how they felt. HP had about twice the dialog of the aforementioned classics.