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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
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This 'about me' will probably be updated when I have the time to edit every site-profile manually, and when I can be more active on the network.

Till then, this remains a placeholder account with all of my previous questions, comments, and whatever else is tied to my alias on SE.

sig: ???


Apr
12
comment How do I avoid tech/social errors in near-future fiction?
Wah! I must've been sleeping or something. Dear current readers and web-surfers, I'm sorry. I always say "Be clear! And precise!" but here I'm say "I'll try to be more abstract"... Forgive me. Overhaul incoming.
Jan
4
comment How can I make a person sound sick?
The empiricist way is doubly amusing.
Dec
19
comment Is it okay to mention a person's nationality and accent only once or twice in a story?
Are all those dialects... um, real?
Nov
29
awarded  Yearling
Nov
25
comment What does/would it mean to code a novel?
"Algorithmic fiction", no idea. "Algorithmic fiction writing", I imagine would be quite constrained, badly so, even. But, maybe something like the snowflake method? (It's somewhat popular, but I can't personally vouch for it.)
Nov
20
revised How do I avoid tech/social errors in near-future fiction?
Fixed grammar, improved formatting, changed some of the content.
Nov
20
comment Can we enable readers to connect to far future humanity, without pretending they wouldn’t be different?
@CLockeWork I wasn't talking about tropes. Maybe the portrayals of cyborgs, VI, etc are usually trope-ic. But I do believe we're balanced on a knife's edge right now. If we don't fall to where we came (apocalypse/dystopia/...) or fall forward (singularity/utopia/...) we'll remain pretty much the same. And when we do fall either way, you'll just have to see how what made us fall (technological revolution/...) would change us. 100% of 'major social shifts' historically were because of inventions and tech-discoveries.
Nov
20
comment Can we enable readers to connect to far future humanity, without pretending they wouldn’t be different?
@CLockeWork Sure, in hind-sight. But, could you take this history and present and extrapolate on the future? Because then the slippery slope 'argument' would be quite appropriate for the situation. My point was, unless we physically change (a lot) then modern values/motives will remain, they're in equilibrium. You have the overly liberal and the conservative; I wouldn't identify with any -phobics, but I'd understand them in context.
Nov
20
comment Can we enable readers to connect to far future humanity, without pretending they wouldn’t be different?
Yup. Pretty much the only setting the OP would want to worry about this in is a future where most of us are physically (and so most probably also mentally) different from now. Like, a future of cyborgs or virtual reality.
Nov
20
comment How do I avoid tech/social errors in near-future fiction?
So, should I pick one?
Nov
20
comment Can we enable readers to connect to far future humanity, without pretending they wouldn’t be different?
Why should they be so different? Most drastic changes throughout history resulted from cultures meeting and assimilating or destroying one another. And from major industrial and scientific inventions/discoveries. The way the world works now, with most upcoming industrial/scientific 'revolutions' foretold in one way or another, and the internet acting as a live record of history, any future changes will have to be gradual or at least smooth and strongly connected to the 'past' (present). And for several reasons, I don't believe our 'common' values will change much, unless we turn post-human.
Nov
20
answered How do I avoid tech/social errors in near-future fiction?
Nov
18
comment Procrastination on a Crucial Scene in my Book
I'll add sth I tried before, and it kinda worked. Write the important bits of the scene, disjointed and with no clear markers, conjunctions, or the like. Leave it in your archive for a week or so. Make sure you remember the scene in your mind in the same fuzzy way you always see it in. Then write it again; you've probably already forgotten the particulars of the first draft. Then again, and again. Collect all the drafts (as many as you want), read them over, right a detailed outline, then the first concise draft.
Nov
18
comment What does “MC” in section break mean?
Hex only runs up to F. How could " M C" be in utf8?
Nov
15
awarded  Informed
Nov
12
comment How should I execute this idea?
@dmm Heh -_- That was a joke, right?
Oct
7
comment Trouble with punctuation and style of a sentence
"Punctuating long stacked dependent/relative clauses"?
Oct
2
comment Is there enough money in writing for me to quit my dead end job?
Yup. Furthermore, for practice, lessen the time you write everyday, commit yourself to one project, work on it for a year or so (reading about writing, rewriting, reviewing at critique circles, etc) and then try it at Amazon Direct Publishing or something similar. If you feel up to it, you could even try first-hand marketing through open social networks (twitter, Reddit, G+, etc) or tailored forums (sorry, can't remember any ATM).
Sep
26
comment Should I use present or past tense when the narrator talks about an universal/most-often-true statement?
@AlexandroChen Yes. Past tense, third-person.
Sep
25
comment Should I use present or past tense when the narrator talks about an universal/most-often-true statement?
It confuses me only when, from the POV (omniscient/limited/etc.) of the narration (not the narrator, if it exists), the sentence discusses a universal/most-often-true statement. For that I usually use the same tense as the rest of the narration. - When it's internal dialog/monologue, I just write it so it sounds right, as spoken dia/mono-log; and it is.