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comment Avoid repeating specific words with no synonyms
13 Norwegians and 6 Norways seems reasonable to me in an essay about your experience learning the language. What makes you think it's too many? Too many for what?
Jul
24
comment Legal or copyright problems using Google drive or other cloud storage for story notes?
You would need a lawyer to determine that for certain. People often get up in arms about some online service or other requesting the right to copy users' stuff, but usually it's expressly to give the service permission to do what the user is using the service for. A cloud storage service, for example, needs your permission to store your stuff, and to present it back to you. Other kinds of online services--such as social media sites--are a whole nuther kettle of bees. If you're concerned, consult a lawyer. In any event, read the agreement you're agreeing to.
Jul
24
comment Has leading changed over the last 15 years?
Interesting question. Too bad there's no typography section on StackExchange.
Jul
21
comment Market for novellas and/or novelettes
Why on earth was this voted down? It appears to be the first one that gives a direct answer.
Jul
16
comment If I get a free ISBN through Amazon's CreateSpace now, will that impact any decisions about getting my own ISBN later?
Right. The issue for me is not the source of the ISBN, but the imprint associated with the ISBN in the distributors' listings. I am an honest-to-goodness publisher, and want to appear so. Using a free or inexpensive CreateSpace ISBN raises a flag for booksellers. My ISBNs are associated with my publishing company. The only thing to distinguish my books from anyone else's is the quality of the stories, covers, descriptions, and interior formatting. I don't want to give booksellers a reason to reject my books before they even get a look at them.
Jul
16
comment What do I put on my copyright page when self-publishing?
Given the comments on the original question, I get the impression that CC doesn't fit the OP's needs. I may be wrong. And I don't use CC or similar licenses for my fiction, so I don't have advice about that. It's an interesting option to consider, so I hope you add an answer.
Jul
15
comment Sequence of Events
Multiple first person POV has been done. It is very difficult. You have to be very, very good with character voice.
Jul
14
comment What do I put on my copyright page when self-publishing?
Jay, that's my sense of it, too. Every now and then an author will set up a company. John Grisham uses Belfry Holdings, Inc. But usually the author holds the copyright personally.
Jul
13
comment What do I put on my copyright page when self-publishing?
A business name with a presence on the web can make a book somewhat more attractive to book stores. A "Doing Business As" (DBA) company is fairly inexpensive to set up. Mine cost about $150 to establish, including fees to Sacramento and California. And $30 per year in business taxes. (DBA income is just personal income). I claim copyright to the text in my own name, and other rights (cover design, interior design) under my business name.
Jul
12
comment Main character trouble
Yes, that's a great idea. It doesn't have to be a scene that will end up in the book. Just a scene, or even a short story, that gets the character interacting with some setting and some characters, dealing with some conflict or other problem.
Jul
11
comment Main character trouble
Maybe. Maybe not. There's a very good chance that you will discover the main character's backstory as you write.
Jul
8
comment What to do with cliched metaphors?
@what I wonder. Certainly my examples are tongue in cheek. And that's what pops most readily to my mind. But is that limitation inherent in the idea of twisting a metaphor? I don't know.
Jul
3
comment controversial rape subject in mainstream novel?
Why not write it and find out?
Jul
1
comment How rough should a rough draft be
What happens (in the text or in your head) that makes you want to edit?
Jul
1
comment My story passes in choppy blocks - how can I fix it?
It's just a rule of thumb ;-) If the character satisfies the scene goal, see if you can make things worse with respect to some larger goal. Maybe: Out of the frying pan into the fire. As when Indiana Jones's bag of sand trick "works," but triggers the boulder trap. Or: The way out requires sacrificing something crucial to the larger goal. Or: Getting out ticks away precious time. Or: Escaping makes the bad guy redouble his efforts.
Jul
1
comment My story passes in choppy blocks - how can I fix it?
A useful rule of thumb for commercial fiction: The character must fail, and the failure must get worse. And if the character happens to succeed, or appears to succeed, we soon learn that "succeeding" actually made things worse. But it's just a rule of thumb, not a law. I hadn't thought about the possibility that a success might lead to a dilemma. Seems like a fruitful approach.
Jun
29
comment in years that vs. in years when
This feels like more of an English language question than a writing question. Perhaps someone who knows how to migrate it will do that. Myself, I would go with "years in which."
Jun
27
comment How to improve logic/reduce plot holes?
advancedfictionwriting.com/articles/snowflake-method
Jun
27
comment Manuscript format: Straight or curly quotation marks?
William Shunn replied, "My recommendation today would be to use smart quotes (curly quotes)." He intends to update his format guide "soon." He also says, "The fact is, anything you can do in your manuscript (which will almost certainly be delivered electronically) that makes life easier for the typesetter or book designer is probably going to be welcomed. So, if no one needs to go through your document and convert the straight quotes to curly quotes, that's going to be a good thing for all involved."
Jun
27
comment How to improve logic/reduce plot holes?
Isaac Asimov worked that way, though he omitted step 4. Robert Heinlein also omitted steps 2 and 3.