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Mar
3
answered Fiction writing: is using Git overkill?
Feb
26
answered Discouraging link to Lulu or CreateSpace
Feb
19
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
You may have to generalize Lauren's excellent advice. Is there anything going on that would be known in both places? Anything that might mark the timeframes as being the same? Maybe something that happened on the news just before these scenes, and is on both POV characters' minds. Or a well-known occasion, like a holiday, or an election, or the Dow Jones tanking. It might be ongoing or very recent. It might be in the near future, and the POV characters are anticipating it. Or (perhaps less helpful here) an event observable in both places, such as an eclipse. Anything like that?
Feb
18
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
Yes, you add a # mark each time you switch storylines. That is perfectly fine in a manuscript. If you publish it, you may want to indicate a scene break in some other way. Take a look at a few of your favorite books for ideas about that.
Feb
18
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
A challenge with "meanwhile" is that it momentarily pops into the narrator's POV (or the author's). This can work if you've brought the reader to expect a narrator's POV. But if you're usually in a character's head, the "meanwhile" breaks the POV in a more jarring way. Writers who are awesome at transitions can write them so smoothly that they don't always need an explicit scene break. For example, in The Fourth Hand, John Irving sometimes switches POV characters in the middle of a sentence, and does it in a way that you follow from one character's head to another's without the slightest bump.
Feb
18
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
Yes, Mark, that's called a scene break. When readers see scene breaks, they typically expect that something has jumped: Time, location, or POV character. So: To indicate a jump in time, location, or POV, add a scene break. Printed books and ebooks represent scene in a variety of ways. For manuscripts, a common way to indicate a scene break is to put a single pound sign on a line by itself. shunn.net/format/story.html
Feb
18
answered Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
Feb
13
answered Using Present Tense to describe a Fact on a story that uses Past Tense
Feb
12
answered Creative writing exercises for engineers
Feb
11
answered How/When to include twists when developing plot.
Feb
9
comment Fantasy - chapter length
I did try to hedge on that one with "can." Perhaps a more emphatic qualifier is in order.
Feb
7
answered Fantasy - chapter length
Feb
5
comment How to stay motivated while rewriting?
I think I'll leave the comments as comments, add a note about them in the answer, and hope for Lauren's forgiveness.
Feb
5
revised How to stay motivated while rewriting?
add pointer to further info in the comments.
Jan
30
comment How to stay motivated while rewriting?
I will. I may not be able to get to it for three or four days.
Jan
30
revised How to stay motivated while rewriting?
Add link to Dean Wesley Smith's blog post about myths of rewriting
Jan
30
comment How to stay motivated while rewriting?
4. (how to learn without rewriting). As in #3. Also, when you finish reading something you like, study it to see how the author did it. Each thing you learn, either from other authors or from your own errors, becomes something you can practice. Each time you start a new project, pick one aspect of craft to focus on, and practice that while writing the new story.
Jan
30
comment How to stay motivated while rewriting?
2. First, "obvious" was a poor choice of words. Second, I left out a step: Have a trusted reader (or several) read the story and alert you to errors. Fix the ones you agree with (as in #1, above). 3. As first readers point out errors (or as you notice them yourself), you learn the kinds of errors you make. You can practice doing that kind of thing better in the next story, and the next.
Jan
30
comment How to stay motivated while rewriting?
1. Instead of trying to edit the erroneous bits into goodness (which I suspect is what the OP means by "rewriting"), one alternative is to throw them out and write them as if you're writing the first draft. I did that when my writer's group pointedly objected to an ending where my MC simply ran away from the problem. I threw out the ending, and wrote another one. Technically that may be rewriting, but it was in creative mode, and not the kind of "boring and tedious [editing?] process" that the OP talks about.
Jan
29
answered How to stay motivated while rewriting?