11,955 reputation
11534
bio website dalewriting.dale.emery.name
location Sacramento, CA
age 56
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 6 hours ago

I write fantasy, science fiction, and mystery stories.

See my dalewriting and dalefiction blogs.


1d
comment Clear steps for developing a powerful inner conflict
Sounds like an awesome, juicy dilemma. For one thing, the stakes are very high. And (I'm guessing here) the character is profoundly attached to each horn. Very powerful. Can you say what makes it seem weak to you?
1d
answered How to decide the position of short phrases?
Mar
19
answered How do you effectively denote a non-“heading-ed” transition into a concluding section?
Mar
18
answered Subtitle for Short Story
Mar
12
comment How do I demonstrate ideological differences between characters who are politically not too different?
This may not help, but it won't hurt, and it's a lot of fun... and on point: youtube.com/watch?v=l3fAcxcxoZ8
Mar
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
7
answered Structuring a novel like a television or graphic novel series
Mar
6
answered Proper way to punctuate an abrupt stopping of speech?
Mar
3
comment Fiction writing: is using Git overkill?
I write other stuff in markdown, but (for some reason) not fiction. I write in Scrivener, export to HTML or Markdown, then use other tools to create epub files. I'm working on automating as much as I can, but so far it's a pain. As for how to format ebooks for Kindle, that's a question better asked on the KDP site or on the Ebooks StackExchange.
Mar
3
answered Fiction writing: is using Git overkill?
Feb
26
answered Discouraging link to Lulu or CreateSpace
Feb
19
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
You may have to generalize Lauren's excellent advice. Is there anything going on that would be known in both places? Anything that might mark the timeframes as being the same? Maybe something that happened on the news just before these scenes, and is on both POV characters' minds. Or a well-known occasion, like a holiday, or an election, or the Dow Jones tanking. It might be ongoing or very recent. It might be in the near future, and the POV characters are anticipating it. Or (perhaps less helpful here) an event observable in both places, such as an eclipse. Anything like that?
Feb
18
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
Yes, you add a # mark each time you switch storylines. That is perfectly fine in a manuscript. If you publish it, you may want to indicate a scene break in some other way. Take a look at a few of your favorite books for ideas about that.
Feb
18
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
A challenge with "meanwhile" is that it momentarily pops into the narrator's POV (or the author's). This can work if you've brought the reader to expect a narrator's POV. But if you're usually in a character's head, the "meanwhile" breaks the POV in a more jarring way. Writers who are awesome at transitions can write them so smoothly that they don't always need an explicit scene break. For example, in The Fourth Hand, John Irving sometimes switches POV characters in the middle of a sentence, and does it in a way that you follow from one character's head to another's without the slightest bump.
Feb
18
comment Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
Yes, Mark, that's called a scene break. When readers see scene breaks, they typically expect that something has jumped: Time, location, or POV character. So: To indicate a jump in time, location, or POV, add a scene break. Printed books and ebooks represent scene in a variety of ways. For manuscripts, a common way to indicate a scene break is to put a single pound sign on a line by itself. shunn.net/format/story.html
Feb
18
answered Changing location in a fiction story with two or more story lines happening at same time
Feb
13
answered Using Present Tense to describe a Fact on a story that uses Past Tense
Feb
12
answered Creative writing exercises for engineers
Feb
11
answered How/When to include twists when developing plot.
Feb
9
comment Fantasy - chapter length
I did try to hedge on that one with "can." Perhaps a more emphatic qualifier is in order.