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comment Why do news articles and press releases start with date and location?
I’m undecided about the where, but it truly irks me when blog posts do not include a date, especially if they then go on to talk about “recently” and “just last week”.
Dec
18
answered Why is having too many symbols a bad idea?
Sep
25
comment How to write a guide based on personal experiences without sounding as if I'm bragging?
I think humanizing yourself is crucial. The best way not to sound like a braggart is to… not brag. If you can bring up the series of mistakes that led you to stumble upon "the right way," your advice will resonate even more with readers who are encountering the same difficulties. Same goes with showing you didn't come up with an idea entirely on your own (you were inspired/guided by someone else with possibly more authority), etc.
Jul
17
comment How to write a book in 2 weeks?
You could use something like Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator, over and over :)
Jul
11
awarded  Commentator
Jul
11
comment What to do with cliched metaphors?
To me the real problem with the bolded metaphor isn't that it's cliché, but rather that it's not an appropriate description of the situation. In other words, the mother showing concern after her child talks about death should not lead to "we don't speak the same language." It's not a sensible reaction in my opinion.
Jun
28
awarded  Critic
Jun
21
comment Feedback: What to use and what to ignore?
Making changes based on statistics is equivalent to writing by committee. That's something that really made me wince in the question.
Jun
19
comment Feedback: What to use and what to ignore?
Very good answer, but there are two points I'd like to make: 1) I think part of the art of receiving feedback is understanding how to translate it (this applies to any kind of product development). Sometimes your readers might say they would have done it differently, etc. Sure, don't just change it to whatever that person would have done, but try to figure out why they think that would make a better story. Corollary: 2) I think it's okay to use feedback to fix specifics in a story. Not necessarily clear errors, but punctual events that might work out better differently.
Jun
19
comment Should you publish or share poetry that was written simply in an angry or sad rant?
Also, plenty of great artists have been known to be angry/depressed/suicidal/delirious/stoned/drunk while producing some of their best work. The only thing the audience cares about is whether it's good.
Jun
19
comment Is BDSM becoming mainstream?
@Reed, my opinion is that if such elements do not serve your story meaningfully, they are going to detract from it at the very least. At worst, they'll turn off your readers who were not expecting "that kind of story."
Jun
14
revised How to make the reader “accept” absurdity?
added 152 characters in body
Jun
14
revised How to make the reader “accept” absurdity?
added 152 characters in body
Jun
14
revised How to make the reader “accept” absurdity?
added 1 character in body
Jun
13
revised How to make the reader “accept” absurdity?
added 422 characters in body
Jun
13
awarded  Teacher
Jun
13
answered How to make the reader “accept” absurdity?
Aug
1
comment Is it unnecessary to mention that there is a silence in the following cases?
I think the key in this answer is "if it's important to you." If you want to mention the silence to indicate tension or something along those lines, then it's not necessary to do it specifically. You could say that Eri stares at her palm and starts rubbing it nervously, for instance. You thus invoke your readers' imagination, who will then fill in the blank on their own and imagine silence, or anything else that might not be crucial to your story. A long break in dialogue to introduce narrative does just that: break up the dialogue. It's implied that the characters stopped talking for a bit.
Aug
31
awarded  Editor
Aug
31
awarded  Excavator