25 reputation
4
bio website
location Maine
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Sep 7 '11 at 18:18

God and writing are the only two things that have always been the same for me. Everything else has changed. I'm a stay at home mom. I homeschool my 3 kids in the woods on a small farm with chickens and dogs and in-laws. On the road to the life I now live, I called 6 states home. I was healthy; an athlete with dreams of a military career, college, travel.

I didn't do any of those things, but I love what I have done. I use my spare quiet moments (she laughs out loud at the joke) to write, or take a drive and snap anything beautiful I can find, which is a lot around here.

I dream of muscle cars revving their engines down the road-roads without speed signs and traffic lights to slow them down. And my husband is beside me.


Sep
3
awarded  Editor
Sep
3
revised What elements should be included in a story's setting?
Corrected spelling, fixed tense, grammar
Sep
3
suggested suggested edit on What elements should be included in a story's setting?
Aug
31
awarded  Supporter
Aug
29
comment If in real life the antagonist is often oneself, shouldn't it work in a full length novel?
You really put this in a way I could understand it Dale. The outer story is that she is left with the grandfather's estate and the choices she must make regarding it are what force her to confront her past and her feelings about it. The more I think about this though, the more I want to pull her father in as an antagonist in the story. After all, there must be a reason why a granddaughter receives full inheritance over a still living son. Thank you for clarifying the "3 stories" for me.
Aug
29
accepted If in real life the antagonist is often oneself, shouldn't it work in a full length novel?
Aug
29
comment If in real life the antagonist is often oneself, shouldn't it work in a full length novel?
I do remember reading that Craig, however, none of the cited examples seemed to fit the situation of my story. As for the romance part, I really do want to keep it from leaping to front stage. On a different note, I would also argue that a movie has a distinct advantage over a novel in that it can carry a viewer farther without substance simply through it's visual nature (think sweeping vistas and artful cinematography). It seems unfair to use them side by side. Anyway, the father is an antagonist for the young couple, however minor, in that movie.
Aug
28
awarded  Student
Aug
28
awarded  Scholar
Aug
28
comment If in real life the antagonist is often oneself, shouldn't it work in a full length novel?
Thanks for the insight. Perhaps I should watch some anime...
Aug
27
comment If in real life the antagonist is often oneself, shouldn't it work in a full length novel?
Yes, in my haste I did write protagonist twice. Gladly, you got my point. I am just getting used to this format here, please excuse me! Thank you for the advice, I agree. I have action outside the inner turmoil to be sure-I know I wouldn't want to read anything as depressing as an entire novel of a woman keeping herself from happiness and sinking into a depression. It's not my style! Thank you again.
Aug
27
asked If in real life the antagonist is often oneself, shouldn't it work in a full length novel?