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seen Oct 24 '11 at 9:50

Oct
5
awarded  Analytical
Oct
4
comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
And as has been mentioned earlier, if the word has been used in a relatively common manner, you can use the word without citing under fair use terms.
Oct
4
awarded  Commentator
Oct
4
comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
The bottom line is that any individual authors included can trademark a work or phrase just like a business or other organization. They can then license the word, ask for royalties and prevent other authors from using it. Here is a good blog article discussing the topic mywritingblog.com/2007/07/…
Oct
4
comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
Individuals requesting trademarks and what can be trademarked - uspto.gov/inventors/independent/chats/faq/transcriptst_z.jsp (see first question on trademark) dpc123.com/trademarks a little about trademarks for authors. amazon.com/Literary-Law-Guide-Authors-Copyrights/dp/0967457963 A great book outlining trademark law for authors, I suggest you read this if you are interested in the subject. inventors.about.com/od/trademarks/a/Trademarks.htm.
Oct
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comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
Yes, but the restriction those organizations are putting on on creative work. You don't have to be a business organization to obtain a trademark. For instance, if you came up with the word grok and trademarked it. You have complete control of how others can use that word in creative works and businesses. If somebody is writing a novel and included your trademarked word in it and you are not happy with it, you can sue them, ask for royalties etc or ask them to remove it.
Oct
3
answered How do I qualify as a sub-editor?
Oct
3
comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
Sorry zdnet.com/blog/btl/… that is twitter suing over the word tweet
Oct
3
comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
This one giving guidelines on how to use a trademarked work. casaforchildren.org/site/c.mtJSJ7MPIsE/b.6186495/k.43D/… Note the part instructing not to use the trademarked word as a noun
Oct
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comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
zdnet.com/blog/btl/… that is twitter suing over the use of the word twitter.
Oct
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comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
You are having some difficulty understanding the the term. If a word is trademarked, you cannot use it in any sense without giving due credit or royalties. There is a thing called fair use and that gives you limited permission to use in newspaper headings when describing whatever is associated with the trademark in a very narrow way.
Oct
1
comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
Sure, ivanhoffman.com/passive.html, udrpcommentaries.wordpress.com/2009/12/15/… . Also search for WIPO which is the regulation for arbitration. There was a particular guy who held trademarks for a lot of commonly used names. Finally a couple of companies took him to court and the court took them away from him. I can't recall his name at the moment. Anyway they drafted the laws after that.
Oct
1
answered Is there a rule of thumb about the number of pages a work of fiction should have?
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comment What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
No. Words can be trademarked to keep others from using them. This was a very popular tactic a few years ago on the Net to keep others from using common phrases as domain names. The court would always side with the party who owned the trademark. This practice is now frowned upon.
Oct
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revised How do I successfully structure a long fiction piece?
deleted 273 characters in body
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comment How do I successfully structure a long fiction piece?
Please don't edit my answers to say things I didn't say. If you want to add something to it add it as a comment. Thank you
Oct
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answered Good examples of fear/terror inducing techniques used with enemies
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answered Frailties, mistakes, and imperfections
Oct
1
answered What's “fair use” for borrowing someone else's invented term?
Oct
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awarded  Editor