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seen Sep 2 at 11:44

Those who can, do. Those who can't, write.


Oct
6
comment Am I adding too many unnecessary “actions/descriptions”?
Yep, that's what I meant. For example: "Though Eri had always seen the subway in a different way." It's an odd kind of fragment, crying out for a preceding clause. I'd either put something at the start or rephrase it. Having many themes is fine, but I feel that for short stories, you need to distill the theme down to single line that you want the reader to go away with, and build it out from there. In your case, the inciting incident is that the girl fails to feel the earthquake, but how does that link with your themes? Is there an underlying guilt that they're built from, for example?
Oct
6
comment Am I adding too many unnecessary “actions/descriptions”?
I just wanted to say that normally, I don't bother giving line-by-lines here, but I've seen your questions around and have been inspired by how you're truly trying to improve your craft. ;)
Oct
6
comment How to depict Australian characters
I'd recommend something like "The Footy Show" if you want to hear /really/ heavily-accented talk. It's a panel of real blokey-blokes talking footy - doesn't get more Aussie than that!
Aug
19
comment How to make a intellectually disabled character believable?
I'd highly recommend The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. It's told from the perspective of a fifteen year old boy with Asperger's, and the focus isn't on his struggle with the impairment; simply how he deals with the world.
Feb
22
comment Writing from the middle
As a slight variation on this, you could start off with writing the key scenes first as a reference. FWIW I tend to start with them because they're what gets me excited enough to get onto my not-so-interesting lead-up scenes, then go back to the beginning and write everything from start to finish with those scenes in mind. Yes, the key scenes get rewritten in the process and they can change drastically.
Feb
6
comment Killing off a character: deciding if, when and how
+1 Let me add my signature to that petition
Jan
30
comment How do I change a novel from first person to limited third person?
Oooh, yeah, definitely not. The change in POVs happen by chapter. :)
Jan
30
comment How do I change a novel from first person to limited third person?
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought it was common to switch viewpoints in third person? Especially when using limited, which is pretty much the norm these days.
Jan
2
comment Is it a bad idea to vary the voice of the narrator in third person (limited omniscient)?
I'm with Lauren on this. It sounds brilliant.
Dec
31
comment alternatives to “he said” in dialog
That's true, you definitely need to mix it up. I've edited my answer with an additional example to show how you can vary it. :)
Dec
20
comment Peeking through character's mask
You could consider not rescuing him. :P He may crack, but humans are pretty resilient. He could break, run away, take days (weeks, if your timeline allows) to put the facade back up, and then you'd also have a good reason for him to let it slip more often throughout the story.
Dec
14
comment Non-cheap ways to make villains evil?
@SF: That would be interesting, and for me the question would be why he abandons his 'noble' ideals so easily. Was he psychopathic all along and only using the ideals to draw people to him? Or did the struggle for power unhinge him in the process? Because I think that to simply drop beliefs that you have fought hard for isn't generally something we do (though I could be wrong).
Dec
14
comment Non-cheap ways to make villains evil?
@Lauren: It's definitely a YMMV thing - I would think it depends on what qualities in a person you admire the most.
Dec
14
comment Non-cheap ways to make villains evil?
But if they've been using whatever power they have to torment the heroes the whole time, for me it goes beyond contempt to 'I hope you die a horrible, drawn-out death'. :P And then when they sell out everyone around them to save their skin, I wish for an even more terrible one because they're clearly not a human being.
Nov
26
comment Effective ways to enrich your active vocabulary?
Years of learning other languages does help you find out what works and what doesn't. ;)
Nov
22
comment Should it be a Short Story or Full Story
Yeah, I find I never know how much of a story is left until I actually start writing it. Something you think should be short and sweet (ie. "This will be my climax and the last quarter of my book!") turns into something else completely (ie. "Crap, that was only the middle...").
Nov
15
comment Is there a description of location required in intense moments of the story like in a love story
If you want to use the setting, then think about how different places give off different feelings. A sunny, well-lit room with bright colours will have a different feel to a dank basement with dripping pipes and a tiny barred window. Think about the emotions you want to convey and give us just enough description of the place to convey it.
Nov
15
comment Is there a description of location required in intense moments of the story like in a love story
All I was saying is that you should only describe what is necessary to set the mood and give us an insight into the characters. If the answer is nothing (which really, it shouldn't be) then either come up with a new setting or keep it out so that the scene stays tight and tense.
Nov
8
comment Does this opening paragraph grab your attention? (very normal setting)
@me, or @JR? :P
Aug
8
comment Synopsis - multiple POVs and time periods
Connie Willis did something like this in her Blackout/All Clear books, but with four or five POVs and a similar number of time periods. I'd suggest looking up some synopses for them - you might find it helpful.