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Jan
7
comment How much should I describe things or persons, that are not important for the story?
@JSBangs: It's just a coincidence that it also applies to concepts as well as prose. If a concept is not in service of what you are trying to achieve in a story then it necessarily obfuscates your point and should be removed. Anything in service of your objective is necessary and must stay as with hairy hobbit feet referred to above.
Jan
7
comment How much should I describe things or persons, that are not important for the story?
@Ralph Rickenbach - JRR Tolkien is successful because that's the point of his work. You could reduce that argument to "is fiction necessary" to which the hard answer is "no". Tolkien's intention was to build what he saw as a "missing mythology" for the British people, in which point a reference that Hobbits have hairy feet is essential for completeness. The story of LOTR is like a byproduct of this project. The question presupposes that the author themselves considers the detail to be unnecessary in the business of telling the story. In which case the advice is "lose it".
Jan
7
answered How much should I describe things or persons, that are not important for the story?
Jan
7
comment Writing 19th century upperclass English dialog
@Christopher Mahan: That's why you need to actually feel the words in your mouth. I'm sure there's some neurological thing going off but I'm not a scientist. Anyhow if you have engaged in the speaking of dialogue then it becomes easier to write it. Also a good idea to read plays aloud and learn how the cadence works in an actual mouth.
Jan
6
comment original story climaxes - rules / guidelines for this?
Or if your plot is too complicated you could say: For example in Romeo & Juliet is the marriage of Romeo & Juliet the high-point? Or the balcony scene? Or their first meeting? Or their eventual dual suicide in the crypt? And if one of these is the high point then why? (If I have understood the general thrust of the question which I may not have).
Jan
6
comment original story climaxes - rules / guidelines for this?
I have to admit personally I don't really understand this question. In terms of plot what the climactic event is tends to be a matter of accepted structure i.e. it's a derivation of what you are trying to say in the story. This question sounds to me like: "I have this cat, and a mat. The cat is sitting and the mat is underneath it. I'm unsure, if I put all this information in one sentence what the subject of the sentence would be". I wouldn't feel confident answering this question without reference to a contextual example.
Jan
6
comment Writers Communities?
+1 This looks like an excellent forum.
Jan
6
awarded  Scholar
Jan
6
accepted Writers Communities?
Jan
5
comment Writing 19th century upperclass English dialog
@justkt: I think that dialogue is just pretty hard to write well, most film scripts are serviceable at best and great dialogue writers are few and far between.
Jan
5
comment Writing 19th century upperclass English dialog
Good point. Mimicking the register of a language you don't speak will only ever be pastiche. However as writers we should all take note that modern people don't really talk in dialogue either, once you start analysing written dialogue you start to understand why it's not like people really speak. For this reason I would contend it is possible to pastiche the writers of past ages, it's just really difficult.
Jan
5
answered Writing 19th century upperclass English dialog
Jan
5
comment Writers Communities?
@justkt: I've joined many writers' groups over the years and they are always critique circles. I'm talking about an online place like this that deals with polls, discussions, broad subjectivity etc.
Jan
4
comment Writers Communities?
I wish I was 21 and under... but I shall check out the others.
Jan
4
comment Writers Communities?
@neilfein: Nice. But that kind of is experimental writing as opposed to being about experimental writing. But interesting stuff!
Jan
4
revised Writers Communities?
clarity tweak
Jan
4
asked Writers Communities?
Jan
4
comment What are some examples of modern original plots?
@jae: Don't hate the monomyth. Think of it this way. The monomyth made one of the most demonstrably incompetent storytellers in the history of mankind, George Lucas, into one who created one of the best loved stories of modern times. To hate the monomyth is to hate a basic cultural tool that gives the potential to access the minds of an audience at a deep level. What should be hated is the inept use of that tool by people who want it to be a money making device instead of a reflective tool mirroring a philosophically uniting internal truth.
Dec
30
awarded  Student
Dec
29
awarded  Editor