5,862 reputation
530
bio website leostableford.blogspot.com
location Nottingham, United Kingdom
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Oct 14 at 10:52

I started out writing when I was about ten and a teacher gave me an exercise book to direct my overactive imagination and hopefully tame my awful calligraphic skills. One out of two, I suppose, isn't bad. My imagination has been directed but my handwriting remains appalling to this day nearly three decades hence.

At first I wrote what people write, genre novels, trying to make something I would be proud of, a dark fantasy novel to capture the imagination filled with relatable characters and new ideas. After producing a heap of badly written generic tripe with wooden characters, appalling dialogue and wonky plotted garbage I finally fixed the dialogue in the first novel I wrote that doesn't make me blush with shame Hidden Predators, Dangerous Prey.

After that I noodled around trying to make something a publishing house might want to publish before realising my chances of a satisfying career as a writer were about as good as my chances of winning the lottery four weeks straight.

Thereafter I got involved in the murky world of self-publishing and it was a short leap from there to the design of RPGs and other such ephemera. I designed several RPGs and had a whale of a time before Amazon's Kindle brought e-readers to the masses.

Since 2005 I have tried to complete 50k in National Novel Writing Month and have only failed in 2007. In 2012 I have begun to rewrite, ressurrect, polish and produce some solid genre work that I have been proud to publish through KDP Select.

Check out my work (and the artistic stylings of my artist friend Justin on one of the RPGs) at my creative blog: leostableford.blogspot.com


Mar
22
answered What is a good methodology for researching a historical novel?
Mar
17
comment Unquestionable Taboos and Self-censorship
I suppose that a sympathetic/disinterested publisher is something of a must e.g. in my Dune example I don't think his publisher particularly cared about the politics. You seem to be fearful that you are the only person in your society who feels as you feel about the issues and has the courage to publish an elegantly obfuscated message. If so, you really are screwed, no amount of writing will do the slightest bit of good. If not, your first problem: encoding to avoid broad criticism, is solved. You now have a new problem, how to hook up with a subculture that will support your efforts.
Mar
17
answered Unquestionable Taboos and Self-censorship
Mar
16
comment What to do if I end up confused by my own plot because of 'trying to be original' or 'trying to make the story more deep'?
BTW: Hannibal Lecter is a psychiatrist who is a, permanent, patient in mental health care. Red Dragon and Silence of the Lambs both discuss the FBI utilising Lecter's psychiatric behavioural profiling expertise to catch the killers they hunt. So the fact Lecter's a psychiatrist is even a plot point.
Mar
16
answered What to do if I end up confused by my own plot because of 'trying to be original' or 'trying to make the story more deep'?
Mar
16
revised How to achieve a dark and nostalgic feeling/setting in a novel?
Changed word archive to achieve so question made sense.
Mar
15
answered Which version of these three lines is more likely to attract the interest of the reader ? (character's viewpoint vs omnicient narrator)
Mar
9
answered Does giving away free stories boost sales?
Mar
7
answered What's the benefit of using invented languages in-story?
Mar
7
answered How should I approach possibly unfamiliar pop culture in fiction?
Mar
5
awarded  Enthusiast
Mar
4
comment Dialog, just what's the best way to write it?
If your novel is of a particular type (either lit fic or gimmicky) you can have sections in full on screenplay format, something Stephen Fry did in Making History. In genre novels you have to go a long way to get away with that kind of stuff. But writing it straight out like the draft of a play isn't appropriate unless the reader can gain some meaning from your adoption of the approach.
Mar
4
comment Dialog, just what's the best way to write it?
That's pretty much what I like to see so it's pretty much what I like to do. +1
Mar
3
answered Getting emotional while writing, good or bad?
Mar
3
comment Finding the 'voice' of a character
Sounds like a good read. I may hunt it out!
Mar
2
comment Finding the 'voice' of a character
I think my approach to this exploration comes from my time at acting school. This is a very "actory" way to explore a character. Actors have to get to know already written characters but writers can help focus by using similar techniques.
Mar
2
answered Finding the 'voice' of a character
Mar
2
answered How to make travel scenes interesting without adding needless plot diversions?
Mar
2
revised What does “Exposition and Ammunition – back story” mean in screenwriting?
clarification
Mar
1
comment How do I construct a plot out of my many setting/character details?
@JYelton: Diptychs are blessed with a bizarre elegance and are too often a neglected artistic form. I learned of the word from Leone's "Once Upon A Time" diptych of movies (OUAT In The West and OUAT In America). The trilogy is the traditional crowd pleaser but the diptych of complementary narratives is something special when done right.