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 Yearling
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Dec
1
awarded  Yearling
Sep
4
comment Alternate universe vs. historicity: how to set the threshold/expectations?
Just to mention Downton Abbey != a model of verisimilitude for 1920s England. As a British person if I was writing a historical of any kind set in this period I would probably seek out some more depth to my research. However, if I were attempting to pastiche Downton Abbey directly then I would, obviously, just watch Downton Abbey.
Sep
1
answered Alternate universe vs. historicity: how to set the threshold/expectations?
Aug
13
answered Beginners can break rules too?
Aug
8
comment When does repetition start becoming tedious (especially metaphors)?
It occurs to me that simile framing in English has become the signal of a half-baked thought. One of the perennial annoyances is people using the word 'literally' to mean 'metaphorically'. I wonder if that usage crept in because 'like' and 'as if' started to become gauche...
Aug
8
comment When does repetition start becoming tedious (especially metaphors)?
Oh in the first draft the rule is "switch off the inner editor and bang it down". But then in drafting it's time to weed out those pesky as ifs, definitely.
Aug
8
answered When does repetition start becoming tedious (especially metaphors)?
Jun
18
answered How do I develop skills at writing and planning plots and characters?
Jun
6
comment Does self publishing via Amazon or similar services make your book ineligible for later acceptance by a publisher?
In addition I know a small press publisher personally who has let it be known that he would not be averse to re-framing and re-publishing some stuff that I've self-published before because he likes it and thinks it's good. He is a small concern though, so it's not like I'm being courted by HarperCollins or anything...
Jun
6
answered Does self publishing via Amazon or similar services make your book ineligible for later acceptance by a publisher?
Jun
3
comment How to introduce a world that's alien to the reader
It's an odd thing though, when I was 8/9 years old watching Star Wars for the first time I didn't actually read the crawl I was just bouncing up and down in my seat excited to be seeing Star Wars. I always view the opening crawl info as optional filler, the fact of the crawl happening as an experience is more important, or was to me, than the actual content. It's a sort of meta moment, the crawl just means "Hey gang it's Star Wars time!"
May
22
revised Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
Another example
May
22
answered Must protagonists be flawed for satisfying character evolution?
May
21
comment Is there such a thing as the “master copy” of a book?
A book is an example of a "simulacrum" each one is a "copy of an object that has no original", fact fans.
May
15
answered Storyboard a Novel?
Apr
30
revised How to introduce a world that's alien to the reader
added 1469 characters in body
Apr
30
comment How to introduce a world that's alien to the reader
Deus Ex Machina is a symptom of introducing information too late the devil of this one is in the judgement of when something is needed. See Edit Above.
Apr
30
answered How to introduce a world that's alien to the reader
Apr
14
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
20
comment How to write a novel if you only have five minutes here, ten minutes there to work on it?
Answer expanded. HTH.