1,487 reputation
417
bio website
location Sussex, WI
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Aug 12 '11 at 15:13

I am a husband and a father of one (with another on the way). I'm a writer, and I also love Go (the game). Currently, my full-time job is in a factory in Wisconsin, but that's definitely not the longterm plan.


Dec
29
revised How does one deal with world builder's syndrome?
added link to wrede's blog
Dec
29
asked How can a specific (current) event be made timeless?
Dec
28
accepted How does one deal with world builder's syndrome?
Dec
24
answered What are some examples of modern original plots?
Dec
23
answered When is a prologue useful?
Dec
23
answered How should I introduce my characters?
Dec
20
comment How much swearing is TOO much? (And how much is not enough?)
@Mr. Shiny and New: I've read those books quite a few times now, so I don't remember my first reaction, but considering that she was yelling at the woman who had killed one of her sons, I thought it was appropriate.
Dec
20
comment How much swearing is TOO much? (And how much is not enough?)
+1 These are both very good points. I have read some fantasy novels that include certain swear words, but they're used in such a way as to be appropriate. As two of my favorite series, though, I love how Rowling and Jordan both handle swearing in a fantasy setting. I also appreciate that as the HP books near their end, there is a tad more "bad words" when appropriate. It's never extreme, but it fits the story and the characters in them.
Dec
19
answered How much swearing is TOO much? (And how much is not enough?)
Dec
11
comment How does one deal with world builder's syndrome?
I might agree with you if I wasn't getting any writing done, except that I usually have two novels going at the same time. I do write. On one I write the actual story, while on the other I do prep work for the next story. I have two different blocks of time set up to do both. When I finish the story I'm writing, I hope to be ready to start the next one. That's usually the case. I think my problem is in the prep work, though, not that I'm putting the story off...
Dec
11
asked How does one deal with world builder's syndrome?
Dec
10
comment How long can a writer expect to write before publishing his/her first novel?
I accepted this as the answer to my question, because the post you linked to was EXACTLY the kind of thing I was looking for. Thank you!
Dec
10
accepted How long can a writer expect to write before publishing his/her first novel?
Dec
10
comment How long can a writer expect to write before publishing his/her first novel?
I was thinking fiction, I suppose, but I found way0utwest's answer incredibly interesting. Now I'm curious about the difference between fiction and non-fiction. I'd never considered that before.
Dec
10
revised How long can a writer expect to write before publishing his/her first novel?
Edited the title question for clarity's sake.
Dec
10
asked How long can a writer expect to write before publishing his/her first novel?
Dec
10
comment I have written my first novel and I think it's ready. What next?
@jae - I didn't know that. I know Stephen King wrote two novels (can't remember which ones) before finally selling Carrie; they both sold, too, eventually. But they weren't the first. That's always been encouraging to me. I may not ever sell my first novels, but at least right now I can feel as though I'm not just churning my wheels for nothing - that maybe someday people will read these stories. They just won't be the first ones...
Dec
9
comment Do Novels follow a 3 Act/2 Plot Point structure like most Movie Scripts?
I apologize. When you said "The points sound all straight forward? They are! But you need some structure to keep them in mind." it confused me. I thought you were saying those aren't the structure or something. Sorry about that!
Dec
9
comment Do Novels follow a 3 Act/2 Plot Point structure like most Movie Scripts?
Your three important points are, in a nutshell, the 3 Act structure. :-) That's why basically every single novel has one. Your first few chapters are intended to grab readers, introduce main characters, and finally hit the first doorway - that's the introduction. The middle is the rising action. The end is that action coming to a resolution. There you have it. A basic structure for you novel, even if you do no other structuring at all.
Dec
9
awarded  Commentator