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profile for blunders on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


Oct
27
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
20
comment Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
+1 My bad, thanks for replying.
Sep
18
comment Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
When you're recommending a solution that you're affilated with it's required you disclose it. Also, unless I'm missing something, the tool you're referencing is not self-contained; think of Wikipedia being versioned with your tool, and if text is cited from Wikipedi that's updated, the author(s) get a ping and are able to view how other paper are using the source text too. Make sense? Thanks!
Apr
16
awarded  Popular Question
May
9
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
11
revised Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
added 1011 characters in body
Apr
10
comment Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
@Joshua Drake: Might be helpful to add the why you believe that SE would be a fit. Based on the FAQs for Academia.SE - "This site is for academics of all levels—from aspiring graduate and professional students to senior researchers—as well as anyone in or interested in research-related or research-adjacent fields." -- I'd say no, since this question is about learning to write research papers. Thanks for the suggest though, and I'm open to any additional thoughts on the subject. Cheers!
Apr
6
comment Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
+1 @Lauren Ipsum: Agree, and I've added that info. I somehow missed stating that directly in the question. Thanks!
Apr
6
revised Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
added 64 characters in body
Apr
6
comment Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
@Lauren Ipsum: The idea is for the "in house" sources, such as a clone of Wikipedia, to be "big enough" to do a number of research papers. Point of the platform is to make it very easy to learn to write a research paper; the text-only version of Wikipedia is just a few gigs I believe. Point of it being static is to keep it simple. For example, the basic verse would have you copy-n-paste the main ideas from the text, you'd rephrase the copy, and the system would automatically embed the citation in the correct form. And yes, the point of this basic education, not professional writing.
Apr
6
asked Self-contained software environment for authoring research papers
Dec
17
accepted State of the art proof reading tools/methods
Dec
17
comment State of the art proof reading tools/methods
Not a big deal, other item of interest I tried in the past that didn't help, though was interesting was a speed reading system that displayed only a set number of words at a time, though it didn't increase the rate or volume of of errors I'd find; think in fact I was finding less errors.
Dec
17
comment State of the art proof reading tools/methods
Guess I asked in part to make sure there had not been a leap in NLP related to proof reading that I was not aware of. I've tried the e-reader idea before, clearly not a great place to be editing text, and I try to print as little out as possible; though years ago I would and it was a huge waste. Thanks for the feedback though, asked in part just to confirm there nothing of note I haven't tried before.
Dec
17
comment State of the art proof reading tools/methods
+1 @Kate Sherwood: Beyond MS-Word, which I've found to be more confusing than of use, I've tried WhiteSmoke, which was not as you might expect a huge leap better than MS-Word; spelling wise Google is 100x better than MS-Word. As I stated in the question, text-to-voice is in fact one of the few ways I do find of use. I've thought of, and tried to log common errors, but there really does not appear to be a 20/80 pattern to them and managing/referencing them after a short amount of time becomes more overhead than it's worth.
Dec
16
asked State of the art proof reading tools/methods
Jun
4
comment Example of a fictional story without any characters (the story being 1000+ words)
+1 @Standback: Yes, as Ralph Gallagher's answer points to, the nebulous characters you're referring to never develop, and are remain in the background. In a way, I now see more degrees to which characters exist now. Your description of characters being beyond the focus of the story makes sense.
Jun
4
comment Example of a fictional story without any characters (the story being 1000+ words)
Yes, it does make sense, though it points to something I hadn't seen before, that being regardless if the story has characters, or not, there is always at least one person in the story; meaning while third-person narration excludes the existence of the narrator from existing as a character in the story, it does not mean they don't exist; or that least that's my take.
Jun
4
comment Example of a fictional story without any characters (the story being 1000+ words)
+1 @Lauren Ipsum: Related, but different I believe. René Magritte's painting "The Treachery of Images" has a subject, just not the subject one might think it is.