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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Sep 6 '11 at 15:42

Working on several writing projects and desperately battling scope creep on each.


Jun
7
asked Conlang question
Jun
6
answered What style suggestions are common for which words are used in hyperlinks?
Jun
6
revised What's the modern way to handle gender in tech writing?
added 110 characters in body
Jun
6
awarded  Editor
Jun
6
revised What's the modern way to handle gender in tech writing?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jun
6
comment What's the modern way to handle gender in tech writing?
They is plural. "They were at fault" means something entirely different than "He was at fault." ("They was at fault," is idiomatic and bad grammar, but still plural.)
Jun
6
answered What's the modern way to handle gender in tech writing?
Jun
1
comment World Building critique: Building an SF society off a tangent of “Adaptation”
Take 1984. It's a tragedy because Winston betrays Julia. It wouldn't be a tragedy if he didn't. Winston doesn't need to overthrow Oceania or even live, he would just need not to betray his love. That's the crucible, the single moment that captures all of the books themes at once. Is Salim's decision about his job that moment? Or is it something else?
Jun
1
comment World Building critique: Building an SF society off a tangent of “Adaptation”
It looks to me like you're doing a lot of world-building for a short story. Which is fine, but be wary of letting it eat into your deadline. You don't need to address every aspect of society in your story, just a few. Or one. The decision about the job looks like it's important. One other thing: you want to write the story as a tragedy, (Which is fine!) but it's not clear to me ~why~ Salim's fate is sealed. What would have to be different for the story to end happily? You don't need to write that story, but I think you need to know the answer.
Jun
1
comment Can a book be written without an antagonist?
There might also be a useful distinction to be made between terms. (A distinction I failed to notice in my initial response). Whether human or not, an antagonist has to be characterized (otherwise the concept is indistinct from "obstacle"). Conflict may or may not be "antagonistic". The tidal wave is only antagonistic if it is characterized that way. An obstacle is "antagonistic" if it opposes the protagonist with intention. "The man dodged the rock." Is a story without an antagonist. "The man dodged the thrown rock." Is a story with an antagonist. Both have obstacles, but one has intent.
Jun
1
comment Can a book be written without an antagonist?
In literary terms, whatever is stopping the protagonist from achieving his goal is an obstacle. An antagonist creates obstacles. The term "anti-hero" is used to describe a protagonist who is not classically heroic. In Catch 22, Yossarian is the protagonist and an anti-hero. He struggles against obstacles and antagonists, but the primary conflict is his struggle to keep his humanity intact. In Death of a Salesman, Willy Loman is another anti-hero, but Loman has no antagonist. His conflict is his struggle to maintain a sense of identity in the face of collapsing dreams.
Jun
1
awarded  Supporter
May
27
answered Can a book be written without an antagonist?
May
27
comment Do books have to be written in sequence?
The first few sentences are not sequential. They need to be edited. The last is the important bit, the part that was written first. The rest needs to be edited to be intelligible. That's the danger of writing out of sequence, it involves a lot of editing and rewriting. But sometimes, you need to get the last line down first because it's important.
May
26
answered Do books have to be written in sequence?
Apr
8
awarded  Teacher
Apr
8
answered Tools for science-based world building?