316 reputation
15
bio website ArtOfBabel.com
location Toronto, Canada
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Aug 5 '13 at 16:23

I specialize in enterprise application integration using BizTalk server and other technologies. With over 12 years experience, I have perspective that helps me understand your organization's problems, and design and implement effective solutions.

Industries I have worked in include Healthcare (HL7 v3), Insurance, Banking/Finance, Publishing, Logistics, and Telecommunications.

I am also the editor and publisher of an online magazine about systems integration / EAI - ArtOfBabel.com.

Visit my site Erik Westermann.

Presently on-contract, yet available for off-site (remote) part-time consulting


Jul
10
comment Do you have to be good at grammar to get published?
If your first language is not English, you could write in your own language and get your work translated, and maybe edited at the same time. This is likely going to be expensive, yet might help you complete your book/work/etc faster than writing your work only after improving your grammar.
Jul
6
comment How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
@Standback - I believe I directly answered the question "...the story and its architecture drive the characters and what your reader might need to know about them.". The rest of my answer is peripheral, for lack of a better description. The original question seemed to ask about the process of developing a story/plot/narrative/whatever-you-want-to-call-it, so I addressed that first.
Jul
6
comment How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
Reference for plot: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plot_(narrative) and a reference for story: learningnerd.com/the-difference-between-plot-and-story ... you could also try a simple google search using both words: story plot - it could keep the open-minded busy for a while.
Jul
5
comment How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
To clarify: story: basic facts; similar to a news article, plot: the events that occur as perceived by the narrator; includes perception, emotion, opinion, thoughts, and other subjective elements.
Jul
5
comment How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
Someone goes to a store to buy groceries only to find that the store sells software. - versus - Bob was hungry and decided to go shopping. He likes to shop at Garys Grocers because everyone there remembers his name. As he went to the store, he reflected about how he misses his days on the farm. He though about the first time he saw...etc
Jul
4
comment Disclaimer when writing about governmental entities
Some governments took the novel 1984 too literally, but not so much to actually feature a Ministry of Love and Ministry of Truth. Fiction is creative, so be creative - you never know, entire governments could be formed using your ideas. ;)
Jun
7
comment What's the modern way to handle gender in tech writing?
Alice, Bob, and Eve are archetypal characters. Even if your readers are not aware of the the characters, introduce them in a footnote or appendix - your readers will appreciate you when they come across the characters in other material.
Jun
4
comment Example of a fictional story without any characters (the story being 1000+ words)
@blunders The author beautifully renders passages about her surroundings and relationship to them but you're right, The Writing Life is written in first person. The CNF I have read is story-like without characters as such. I remember on where the writer discussed different types of mugs, and another by someone else who discussed yawns - but in the context of their relationship to them or observations about them. So there aren't characters as such - just the author providing a stylized narrative of the truth as they see and relate it. Does that make sense?
May
24
comment Is this description of my small productivity application clear enough?
@static_rtti I'm happy to help! I suggest you simply remove the phrase "It turns out the..." (don't replace it with anything), because it is not really necessary - the paragraph can stand on its own.
May
24
comment Writing about extreme trauma
Great points - horror and trauma arise after the incident since we rarely have the presence of mind, time, or even the need to judge events in this as they occur.
May
4
comment How to attract the average reader to an “intellectual” novel?
The quote is a good example of a sentence that's immediately understandable, yet does not reveal enough to allow it to stand on its own thereby getting the reader to read on. I doubt sales are a good measure of a book's 'goodness' - there's plenty of great free content around.
Apr
27
comment How many words (or lines) are long enough to make someone think about his life but short enough to hook lazy readers?
Too bad this is closed - it's a good topic. The Hemingway answer is great. Here's another "Before I die..." - it expresses a wish, a desire, a goal - something that's attainable and something that's far out of reach - open to a range of possibilities. Maybe something like "Before I Die. I almost laughed when I saw that in the paper. I continued to read what others want to do - "have some fun", "believe", "swim without holding my nose", "live without money" - I was hooked and was..." - you get the idea!