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seen Dec 1 '11 at 6:17

Dec
1
comment Why would an author not agree to license his book to a foreign language?
wasn't thinking about the artistry as much as the restrictions of languages to convey thoughts in the same way as others. IOW the translation (however well intended) might never be able to convey the same message as the original.
Nov
30
awarded  Supporter
Nov
30
comment Why would an author not agree to license his book to a foreign language?
or because they feel the work is impossible to translate, typically poetry and some forms of comedy relying heavily on word use. E.g. Terry Pratchett in Dutch translation (which does exist for at least some books) is terrible (were I the author and able to proofread the translations of those I'd reject the translations out of hand).
Mar
7
comment Do most novels not get published?
Ralph: many publishers will require some up-front money from unpublished authors. And then of course quite a few people eventually (after dozens of rejections) will take their work to a printer and cover the cost of that first hopeful printrun themselves, then lug boxes around to bookstores hoping to sell something (and eventually handing them out for free because noone will buy from an unknown author with no connections to a publisher).
Mar
7
comment Do most novels not get published?
While quality has something to do with getting something accepted, it's certainly not the only thing and for many a publisher probably not even the main thing. Instead the work has to fit into the "formula" for what that publisher has found sells. The very best novel won't get accepted if it's too different from mainstream simply because the economic risk to a publisher may be too great. A lackluster one by another author who already has a few books to her name may be accepted instead because it's almost certain to at least break even.