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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Mar 24 '12 at 7:22

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Dec
13
comment Using a world created by someone else for your own fiction
your first sentence agrees with my gut-feel (lol). You mention Shadowrun, are there any other such collaborative ventures where a novice can cut his teeth, so to speak?
Dec
13
comment The “Rules” of Writing
too true - on this topic: a tool that has become my ONLY web-page storage tool for offline use and as general repository is zotero.org - comes as plug-in for firefox
Dec
13
comment The “Rules” of Writing
this is the kind of info I'm looking for. +1 for a question that resulted in very useful answers
Dec
13
awarded  Commentator
Dec
13
comment The “Rules” of Writing
this, for me as a novice, seems like very good advice indeed
Dec
13
comment The polymath's dilemma…?
good answer - underscores how much craft I still have to learn ...
Dec
13
asked Using a world created by someone else for your own fiction
Dec
13
accepted How to identify a scene type?
Dec
13
awarded  Scholar
Dec
13
accepted Would it be plagiarism if you use a changed scene?
Dec
7
comment How to identify a scene type?
I've tried to clarify my question; purpose is to identify the tools/techniques available, if any..
Dec
7
revised How to identify a scene type?
added 530 characters in body; edited tags
Dec
7
comment How to identify a scene type?
while I think & research your answer, just a comment: explicit sex = pornography; as Terry Pratchett puts it: the difference between them is like using a feather instead of the whole chicken ;)
Dec
6
comment How to identify a scene type?
@John Smithers: How do you know when you read a scene that it depicts a romance or an adventure, or a mix of these, or some other recognizable type of activity or situation? That is what I want to know: what type of scene and why(description/reason) it is that type.
Dec
6
awarded  Editor
Dec
6
revised How to identify a scene type?
edited title
Dec
6
comment How to identify a scene type?
I'm new, still feeling my way & a bit shy to just up & do-it; as with the suspense-example, I want some info on how to identify from the trend of a scene what it's type is, and what a norm/definition for the type could be that would be readily understood. I know the types can be mixed in a novel, e.g. having a romance in an adventure, so I guess I'm more focussed on scene-level than genre-types like horror or science-fiction or fantasy.
Dec
6
comment Something different: Help me find the unnecessary words.
.. or how to self-edit - very useful guidelines.
Dec
6
comment Something different: Help me find the unnecessary words.
+1 good question that lead to really good answers
Dec
6
asked How to identify a scene type?