11,491 reputation
11963
bio website livejournal.com/~_standback_
location Israel
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 3 hours ago

I dabble in writing; I've become increasingly proficient in keeping my condescending nature in check. Haven't written much though. Working on that.

A lot of my experience comes from reading, from books on writing, and from blogs on writing. I've also done a lot of critiquing at Critters.org, and reviewing at The Fix Online. Science-fiction and fantasy are my natural stomping grounds, but everything else is good too.


Jul
13
comment Anybody know anything about examiner.com?
@Shan: I just added a couple of links with more on the subject. More of a scheme than a scam, but far from being in most writers' best interests.
Jul
13
revised Anybody know anything about examiner.com?
links to Writer Beware
Jul
13
revised Anybody know anything about examiner.com?
added 13 characters in body
Jul
13
answered Anybody know anything about examiner.com?
Jul
12
comment Resources on plotting mystery stories
Just found a Wikipedia page on Christie tropes which I'd previously missed.
Jul
12
comment How do you reference pop culture in a dialogue without proper attribution?
+1. If it's commonly-known enough to be recognized, and its primary value is that it'll be recognized, then it doesn't need attribution. Just be aware not to assume a reference is well-known or immediately recognizable without checking it out.
Jul
11
revised How little “fantasy” can be in a story and it still be recognizably fantasy?
typo
Jul
11
asked How can I create drama in a story that is mostly political and procedural?
Jul
11
answered How little “fantasy” can be in a story and it still be recognizably fantasy?
Jul
11
asked How little “fantasy” can be in a story and it still be recognizably fantasy?
Jul
7
comment What is the process for turning a story into a “movie” script?
Do you mean selling the movie rights and getting greenlit, or writing the script?
Jul
6
revised How to avoid getting confused while adding symbols within symbols (novel writing)?
edited tags
Jul
6
revised Using a town to symbolize/represent a character within a story (fiction)?
edited tags
Jul
6
revised Using a town to symbolize/represent a character within a story (fiction)?
edited tags
Jul
6
comment Using a town to symbolize/represent a character within a story (fiction)?
I don't know if the specific "wife <--> town" link has been done, nor where, but using the setting and environment as a reflection of certain characters is a time-honored technique (e.g. Disney's "Beauty and the Beast" takes this concept to its literal extreme). But I'd have difficulty making concrete suggestions for your story without A) knowing more about the wife, the protagonist, the town, and the plot, and B) hearing what you've already come up with yourself.
Jul
6
revised How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
edited tags
Jul
6
comment How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
@Lauren et al: this is probably going off on a tangent, but I'd say there's an obvious differentiation between story and plot. Plot is a single element in the story; it's what you get if you try to summarize what happens in the story. But a story also consists of atmosphere, setting, character development, theme... For demonstration, consider stories that don't have a plot; stories like Memento where you'd need to decide whether the plot goes forwards or backwards or both; fairy-tale retellings where the plot is meaningless except as it relates to the original story... etc., etc.
Jul
6
comment How often do writers develop characters before plot, and why?
I'm having great difficulty understanding how examples of inanimate characters and the importance of structure is meant to provide an answer to the question. Are you suggesting OP should kick off his stories by choosing the structure first, before he has characters (or setting, or plot, or theme, or...)?
Jul
5
comment When I'm replying to emails, what's the best way to acknowledge that I appreciated each point of someone's email?
+1. Good phrasings include: "You made a lot of really good points," "I really like what you've written," "All your comments have been extremely helpful," etc.
Jul
5
revised How can I improve this description which includes actions?
formatting